Danielle Chang

Pu-erh Tea Digestif
Rating: Unrated
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Sweet, smoky earthiness in the tea compliments the barrel-aged Cognac, making for a surprisingly smooth drink.
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Zui Ji (Drunken Chicken)
Rating: Unrated
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This classic Shanghainese banquet dish is traditionally served at the new year to represent togetherness and rebirth. To “intoxicate” the chicken, it’s marinated in rice wine for up to 5 days, so this is a great dish to make ahead. The final flavor will be pungent and alcohol-forward, so choose a high-quality Shaoxing wine.
Prosperity Toss Salad
Rating: Unrated
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Tossed with a sweet-tart and salty dressing made from umeboshi, or pickled Japanese plums, each ingredient in Danielle Chang's version of this colorful composed salad has an auspicious meaning used to commemorate the Lunar New Year. Piles of cucumbers, taro root, and carrots are cut into noodle-like ribbons to represent longevity. Radishes, pomelos, and green vegetables like cucumbers are symbols of good fortune. Chang serves it as an appetizer to raise good luck, encouraging guests to use their chopsticks and mix and toss the ingredients together. According to superstition, the higher they toss the salad, the better their luck will be in the new year.
Any variety of dried and candied fruits can decorate this lightly sweet sticky rice dessert, but using a lucky assortment of eight is traditional. The Chinese word for the number eight, ba, sounds similar to fa, which means prosperity and confers fortuitous meaning on the dessert. For her Lunar New Year celebration, Lucky Chow producer Danielle Chang likes to decorate hers with an opulent assortment that includes candied orange peel, goji berries, amarena cherries, kumquats, lemon peel, edible flowers, mandarins, lychees, red dates (jujube), maraschino cherries, gooseberries, kiwi berries, pomegranate, dragon fruit, and sliced figs. Do not substitute sushi or other short-grain rice here; sweet glutinous rice contains a starch that helps the grains stick together without getting mushy.
This soothing, sweet Chinese dessert soup of rice flour dough balls stuffed with black sesame seeds in a rock sugar–sweetened broth is typically served during reunions because the round rice balls symbolize harmony and togetherness. Lucky Chow producer Danielle Chang likes to make it as a sweet treat for her Lunar New Year celebration. To keep the dough moistened throughout the assembly process, cover it with a damp towel.
Shochu Punch
Rating: Unrated
New!
This vibrant, citrusy make-ahead Shochu Punch features four distinct tastes—sweet, sour, spicy, and bitter—coming from the fruits, flowers, honey, and aromatics that fill the punch bowl. Danielle Chang serves it at her Lunar New Year celebration, where citrus fruits symbolize luck and fertility. This punch may be garnished with a variety of edible flowers, microgreens, and citrus (such as a mix of clementines, lemons, and kumquats). Try floating some in the punch and freezing some in the ice cubes themselves; simply follow the instructions for chrysanthemum ice cubes, swapping in other flowers, greens, and fruits for the chrysanthemums.
Lunar New Year Dumplings
Rating: Unrated
6
Plump and tender dumplings symbolize longevity and wealth. As part of her Lunar New Year spread, Lucky Chow producer Danielle Chang fills hers with a fragrant and flavorful blend of garlic, ginger, scallions, and Chinese chives bound with tender ground pork. Store-bought wonton wrappers may be substituted for freshly made dough. Gently steaming the dumplings in bamboo baskets lined with cabbage leaves helps them keep their pleated shape without tearing and renders the filling juicy and the wrappers supple. For an extra dash of color and heat, drizzle them with with hot chile oil and sprinkle them with with pungent Chinese chives before serving them with dipping sauce.
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The Chinese word for fish (yu) sounds similar to the Chinese word most closely translated to "abundance," so for her Lunar New Year celebration, Lucky Chow producer Danielle Chang serves fish to usher in prosperity and abundance in the new year. Chang uses light soy sauce in this dish—it is lighter in color and higher in salt than dark soy sauce, making it ideal for imparting flavor in steamed seafood.
The longer the better to symbolize longevity, these spicy, savory noodles are a must for Lucky Chow producer Danielle Chang at her Lunar New Year feast. Cutting the noodles is strictly forbidden because cutting is a metaphor for shortening a life, so twirl the long strands to serve and eat. A mix of torn and sliced mushrooms (also a symbol of health and longevity) adds a variety of textures and a bite of umami to this quick-cooking dish.
Lunar New Year Dumplings
Rating: Unrated
6
Plump and tender dumplings symbolize longevity and wealth. As part of her Lunar New Year spread, Lucky Chow producer Danielle Chang fills hers with a fragrant and flavorful blend of garlic, ginger, scallions, and Chinese chives bound with tender ground pork. Store-bought wonton wrappers may be substituted for freshly made dough. Gently steaming the dumplings in bamboo baskets lined with cabbage leaves helps them keep their pleated shape without tearing and renders the filling juicy and the wrappers supple. For an extra dash of color and heat, drizzle them with with hot chile oil and sprinkle them with with pungent Chinese chives before serving them with dipping sauce.
The Chinese word for fish (yu) sounds similar to the Chinese word most closely translated to "abundance," so for her Lunar New Year celebration, Lucky Chow producer Danielle Chang serves fish to usher in prosperity and abundance in the new year. Chang uses light soy sauce in this dish—it is lighter in color and higher in salt than dark soy sauce, making it ideal for imparting flavor in steamed seafood.
The longer the better to symbolize longevity, these spicy, savory noodles are a must for Lucky Chow producer Danielle Chang at her Lunar New Year feast. Cutting the noodles is strictly forbidden because cutting is a metaphor for shortening a life, so twirl the long strands to serve and eat. A mix of torn and sliced mushrooms (also a symbol of health and longevity) adds a variety of textures and a bite of umami to this quick-cooking dish.
This versatile recipe from Danielle Chang's Lunar New Year celebration works with most tender leafy greens—including baby bok choy and choy sum (flowering cabbage)—so pick whatever looks best at the market. Once it is swirled into the garlic-scented oil, the fermented soybean paste adds a layer of savory pungency.