Photo of Aria Alpert Adjani
Photo of Aria Alpert Adjani

Aria Alpert Adjani

Aria Alpert Adjani is a mother of two, actress, snarky storyteller, writer, and cookbook author who thrives on finding the humorous comedic flair everyday life brings and bitches about it to whoever listens.

Expertise: Homecooking, Motherhood, Seasonal Cooking, Farmers Markets
Shell-on shrimp are essential for this recipe; the shells help insulate the delicate shrimp from the heat of the grill so they cook evenly without becoming tough. Give each raw shrimp a quick snip with a pair of scissors along the back for vein removal and easy shelling at the table; you can also look for wild American shrimp marked “EZ Peel,” or ask your fishmonger to tackle the task. In lieu of grilling, the shrimp may be cooked in a skillet over high heat in a well-ventilated kitchen.
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Roasting beets brings out their earthy sweetness, leaving them tender and easy to peel. A vibrant dressing and generous crumbles of fresh cheese complete this elegant side dish.
A mixture of spelt and almond flours, gently combined with cold butter and creamy buttermilk, creates tender, fluffy biscuits that cover this juicy strawberry cobbler filling. Use the sweetest, best-quality berries from the market; their flavor is the foundation of this seasonal dessert.
Removing the outer leaves and inner thistle of each baby artichoke reveals its lightly astringent, mildly sweet core, tender enough for quick cooking. Be careful to wash your cutting board and knife well after preparing the baby artichokes as they can leave behind a bitter residue.
Toasting whole spices deepens and opens up their flavors, perfuming and flavoring this dressing. Use leftover dressing as a marinade for chicken or fish.
Farro has a sweet, earthy flavor and delightful chewy texture; it adds a wonderful hardiness to the fresh, crunchy vegetables and salty olives and cheese in this salad. If Meyer lemons aren’t available in your area, use regular fresh lemon juice and increase the honey to balance the dressing.
Pre-salting the lamb (the longer the better) will deepen its flavor and increase moisture and tenderness in the meat. Afterward, a simple sear then braise renders fork-tender shreds of meat. A spoonful of garlicky gremolata heightens those long-cooked flavors.
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Pre-salting the lamb (the longer the better) will deepen its flavor and increase moisture and tenderness in the meat. Afterward, a simple sear then braise renders fork-tender shreds of meat. A spoonful of garlicky gremolata heightens those long-cooked flavors.