Annabel Langbein

When Annabel Langbein started cooking professionally in 1981, she began gaining weight, eventually putting on 50 pounds. A nutrition course at the Culinary Institute of America in New York's Hudson River valley put her on the course to healthier eating, teaching her how to prepare low-fat dishes that didn't make her feel deprived, like this decadent-tasting soufflé, a swirl of berries and marshmallowy meringue. More Healthy Dessert Recipes
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This combination of zingy herbs, cool noodles, grilled shrimp, and spicy dressing makes a fabulous, easy dish. Plus, it can largely be made ahead of time, then put together just before serving. Squid or chicken are delicious substitutes for the shrimp. More Shrimp Recipes
Large green-shelled mussels are farmed along the coast of New Zealand and exported around the world. The spicy aromatic broth that Auckland cookbook author Annabel Langbein uses here reflects the influence of New Zealand's growing Asian population on its cuisine.
Annabel Langbein often travels to Hong Kong to meet with the printers who work on her cookbooks. At a Cantonese restaurant opposite her hotel in North Point, she tasted a version of this dish, served with piles of lettuce leaves and bowls of finely minced squab for diners to make their own salad cups. In her riff on that, Langbein uses chopped pork instead of squab; the recipe is also good with any poultry. Plus:  Pork Recipes & Cooking Tips 
New Zealand's most abundant farmed fin fish is Chinook, or king salmon, which is prized for its deliciously rich flavor, firm texture and deep orange color.Plus: More Seafood Recipes and Tips
Annabel Langbein loves oven-roasted peppers. Here she transforms them into a silky soup seasoned with cumin, crushed red pepper and cilantro, and finished with seared, sweet scallops. More Recipes with Scallops
Annabel Langbein returns again and again to this savory, Asian-accented dish. The key is selecting dense, thick fillets of the freshest fish, so they stay moist throughout cooking.
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Annabel Langbein returns again and again to this savory, Asian-accented dish. The key is selecting dense, thick fillets of the freshest fish, so they stay moist throughout cooking.