Andrew Carmellini
Andrew Carmellini

Andrew Carmellini

F&W Star Chef » See All F&W Chef Superstars Though he’s won tremendous acclaim for his modern Italian dishes at New York’s Locanda Verde, F&W Best New Chef 2000 Andrew Carmellini is fascinated by traditional American cooking, which he explores at his restaurant The Dutch and in his book American Flavor. Here, his number one entertaining tip, his favorite cookbook and the basic technic everyone should master. What’s one great entertaining tip? Pour heavily. What’s your most requested recipe, the one dish you’re most known for? The rabbit potpie at The Dutch, the sheep’s milk ricotta at Locanda Verde. What’s your favorite cookbook of all time?La Méthode, by Jacques Pépin, the first cookbook I was ever given. What’s the best cheap cooking gadget?Vegetable peeler. One technique everyone should know? How to use heat and fire correctly is elemental.2000 Best New Chef Bio Why Because while working in the French style of the restaurant's owner, Daniel Boulud, he has forged a culinary identity all his own. Born Cleveland, 1971. Education Culinary Institute of America, Hyde Park, NY. Experience Le Cirque 2000 and Lespinasse in New York City. First thing prepared Tossed salad with vegetables from his family's backyard garden. How he got into cooking "I was a very hyperactive kid. My mom says cooking was the only thing that would calm me down." What he'd be if he weren't a chef A guitarist in a rock band. "I've been playing guitar since I was six." A request he said no to Grilled skate. "It's difficult to grill skate." Strangest food eaten Baby loofah (a gourd whose fibrous skeleton is commonly used as a bath sponge) with mushrooms and preserved sea scallops at Ping's Seafood in Queens, in New York City. Favorite food books "I have a lot of out-of-print reference books on plants, flowers and vegetables." How he gets to work Bicycle. Least favorite food Sea urchin. A frustration The sudden rise in food allergies. "I wonder why that is?" Favorite wine "The monster reds. I had a 1971 Ridge Montebello recently that was so good it was almost a meal." Won Best New Chef at: Café Boulud, New York City
New York City chef Andrew Carmellini tops crusty grilled bread with Italian scamorza cheese and a mildly spicy mix of peppers. He swears by dried Calabrian oregano pulled right off the stem as the perfect finish to the tasty crostini. Slideshow:  More Crostini Recipes 
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Calabrian Carbonara
Rating: Unrated
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New York City chef Andrew Carmellini uses Calabrian 'nduja, the spicy, spreadable sausage, to bring loads of delicious heat and flavor to his silky carbonara. Slideshow:  More Pasta Recipes 
Carmellini serves this tomato-free take on the classic pasta sauce at Locanda Verde, his modern Italian taverna inside Robert De Niro’s Greenwich Hotel. He simmers ground veal and pork in white wine and half-and-half, creating a velvety cream sauce to toss with pappardelle. Slideshow:  More Pasta Recipes   Recipe from Food & Wine Best New Chefs All-Star Cookbook. 
Garlicky and bright, these crostini are fabulous for entertaining. You can prepare the fava-ricotta pesto in advance and top the toasts just before guests arrive. If you love Parmigiano-Reggiano, follow Carmellini's suggestion to "go heavy with the shaved cheese." Slideshow: More Bean RecipesRecipe from Food & Wine Best New Chefs All-Star Cookbook 
This brilliant take on steak frites is a specialty of chef Andrew Carmellini. He tops seared strip steaks with a butter infused with tarragon, shallots and vinegar—key ingredients in béarnaise sauce—and serves them with tangy French fries made with vinegar-brined potatoes. Slideshow:  More Steak Recipes 
Sweet-Potato Meringue Pie
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This sweet-potato pie looks like a pumpkin pie, but the filling is actually made with sweet potato. Slideshow: More Delicious Pies and Tarts Plus: Ultimate Thanksgiving Guide 
One of the most popular cured meats on restaurant charcuterie boards, soppressata is a hard salami from southern Italy. Andrew Carmellini's family grinds their own meat to make it, but much easier is buying Italian sausages and removing their casings. To give the fresh soppressata extra spice, use hot sausages instead of sweet ones, or increase the amount of crushed red pepper. Slideshow:  Great Italian Recipes 
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Andrew Carmellini's luxurious, creamy eggs are heavenly on their own, but serving them with smoky sable, briny roe and rich sour cream puts them over the top. Plus: Brunch Recipes 
Smoked-Whitefish Chowder
Rating: Unrated
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To make this lightly smoky chowder, Andrew Carmellini cleverly cooks potato chunks in milk and cream, which both enriches the potatoes and thickens the broth. He also adds corn and a mix of herbs to brighten the flavor. Slideshow:  More Seafood Recipes 
One of the most popular cured meats on restaurant charcuterie boards, soppressata is a hard salami from southern Italy. Andrew Carmellini's family grinds their own meat to make it, but much easier is buying Italian sausages and removing their casings. To give the fresh soppressata extra spice, use hot sausages instead of sweet ones, or increase the amount of crushed red pepper. Slideshow:  Great Italian Recipes 
Andrew Carmellini's luxurious, creamy eggs are heavenly on their own, but serving them with smoky sable, briny roe and rich sour cream puts them over the top. Plus: Brunch Recipes 
Smoked-Whitefish Chowder
Rating: Unrated
1
To make this lightly smoky chowder, Andrew Carmellini cleverly cooks potato chunks in milk and cream, which both enriches the potatoes and thickens the broth. He also adds corn and a mix of herbs to brighten the flavor. Slideshow:  More Seafood Recipes 
Chef Way Andrew Carmellini's sauce uses blood oranges, tangelos, clementines and tangerines. He sautés the shrimp separately.Easy Way Prepare a fast citrus sauce by adding grapefruit juice to the skillet as you cook the shrimp. More Shrimp Recipes
Most restaurants make pork fried rice with generic pieces of barbecued meat; Andrew Carmellini uses both seared ground pork and sweet, aromatic Chinese sausage in his playful version. As an alternative to Chinese sausage—which is now available at many Costco stores—substitute thick matchsticks of lean maple-cured bacon. More Chinese Recipes
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Pappardelle with Lamb Ragù
Rating: Unrated
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Chef Way Andrew Carmellini serves fresh pappardelle with a ragù of house-ground lamb shoulder cooked in lamb stock. He finishes the dish with fresh ricotta and chopped mint.Easy Way Use store-bought pappardelle, ground lamb and chicken stock, then top the dish with fresh ricotta and mint. More Recipes With Lamb
Ligurian Seafood Stew
Rating: Unrated
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Chef Way After blanching peas, snap peas and fingerling potatoes, Andrew Carmellini adds them to a homemade mussel broth along with sea bass, clams, an herb pesto and little seafood meatballs made with shrimp, chorizo and scallops.Easy Way Narrow the ingredient list to the delicious basics—shrimp, sea bass and clams. Use bottled clam broth as a stand-in for mussel broth and flavor it with spicy chorizo. More Seafood Recipes
Andrew Carmellini's dish is a mix of two beloved salads: shrimp-avocado and shrimp-citrus. He throws in a few surprises, too, like the hot sauce in the dressing. He recommends a fruity one from the Caribbean made with habaneros: "Habaneros are crazy," he says. More Delicious Shrimp Dishes
Gnocchi with Wild Mushrooms
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Chef Way Andrew Carmellini cooks homemade gnocchi in his own intense mushroom stock, then serves them with porcini butter (blended with garlic, herbs and Parmesan) and white-truffle shavings.Easy Way Store-bought gnocchi and chicken stock fill in for the homemade kinds. The topping: Parmesan cheese and truffle oil. More Gnocchi Recipes
"I love the word fricassee, Andrew Carmellini says. He garnishes his with celery leaves.Plus: F&W's Chicken Cooking Guide More Great Chicken Recipes
Chicken Posole
Rating: Unrated
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Andrew Carmellini learned to make posole with veal head; this recipe calls for chicken. More Fantastic Soups
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Braised Chicken with Peppers
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Chef Way Andrew Carmellini brines chicken, then dries it for a few hours in the refrigerator. He stews the bird in a combination of veal and poultry stocks, then seasons it with his own peperonata, which he makes with Peppadew (jarred peppers from South Africa), olives and dried Piment d'Espelette (a type of chile pepper).Easy Way Don't brine or dry the chicken. Instead of making peperonata, add Peppadew and olives while the chicken braises. More Chicken Recipes