Adam Robb

Adam Robb is a writer and photographer living in New York. He has more than a decade of on-the-ground reporting experience, from the gilded butcher shops of Sydney, to the pepper trees of Sichuan, and the smoky back rooms of Vienna's most notorious nightclubs.

Experience: Adam Robb began his food writing journey with @restaurantgirl, an early parody Twitter account that skewered contemporary food writing. The account went viral and was featured in the New York Times and on "Page Six" of the New York Post.

After two years of local reporting for his hometown Jersey Journal, Adam was named city editor for Thrillist Philly and Thrillist AC in 2012.

He's spent the past ten years covering the dining scene near and far, as a contributing writer and photographer for local New York publications including the Village Voice and Grub Street, while traveling abroad for national titles including T: The New York Times Style Magazine, WSJ Magazine, Architectural Digest, Conde Nast Traveler, Departures, Food & Wine, GQ, Travel + Leisure, and Whisky Advocate.

Since 2021, Adam has begun to incorporate investigative reporting into coverage of the hospitality industry, for publications including The Intercept, and Billy Penn, an affiliate of WHYY public radio in Philadelphia.
New openings from Coral Gables to Fort Lauderdale prove that Southern Florida's restaurant boom is just beginning.
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As coffee shops become communal again, Vinh Le of Cicada Coffee is hoping to lure diners with his take on the northern Vietnamese drink, which is best served in-person.
Layla, the first-ever restaurant from the reservations platform, is located inside the first-ever Kayak hotel in Miami Beach.
As dining rooms go dark, chefs are resuming specialty grocery operations that meet diners halfway.
In a new era of social distancing, a restaurant set on 683 acres could not have had worse or better timing. Barn8, from Louisville hoteliers Steve Wilson and Laura Lee Brown, is now open for business—mostly.
Some restaurateurs will be working through a holiday they vowed to never work again. Others are determined to make the day special.
In Kinston, North Carolina, hospitality is everything. As the public health crisis wreaks havoc on local businesses, we reached out to every restaurant in town and collected stories of fear, hope, and survival.
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He's also trying to make a Zoom version of Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives so he can drive business to restaurants for takeout.
The hospitality industry is demanding next steps from state and local governments that mandate ever-increasing restrictions but offer no relief.
In Kinston, North Carolina, hospitality is everything. As the public health crisis wreaks havoc on local businesses, we reached out to every restaurant in town and collected stories of fear, hope, and survival.
He's also trying to make a Zoom version of Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives so he can drive business to restaurants for takeout.
The hospitality industry is demanding next steps from state and local governments that mandate ever-increasing restrictions but offer no relief.
Guests can walk directly into the Wayfarer's open kitchen, tie on an apron, and pore over recipes.
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Nestled in an Alpine village, the tiny space has five stools and hundreds of the world's best whiskies.