Wine

Wine has been produced for thousands of years, which makes it no small feat that its popularity is still on the rise. The F&W guide to wine puts everything you need to know in one place, whether you are interested in buying, tasting, pairing, or learning about wines. If your goal is to better understand what you’re drinking, check out features like our Wine 101 series, which covers the history of wine regions and popular varietals, or our blog series, Dear Decantress (http://www.foodandwine.com/blogs/dear-decantress-help-my-wine-vocabulary-sucks), which helps you tackle the basics of tasting and talking about wine. Getting to try new wines is one of the joys of traveling, that’s why the F&W editors have curated lists of the their favorite places to drink wine across the globe. There are also top picks for producers, so you can visit amazing wines at the source.

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Food & Wine: Best Wine Bars in London
Best Wine Bars in London
Today, wine bars are fashionable. There's even been talk that wine itself might be... *whisper it* cool. Things were very different when I was growing up. Wines bars were considered terribly old-fashioned. Most weren't even aimed at wine lovers. Instead, they were places to drink that were open later than pubs. You might have gotten some cheese and crackers or shop-bought pate to eat, if you were lucky. There was a chain in the north of England called Yates's Wine Lodge; from the name, you'd imagine it was a good place to discuss the difference between left bank and right bank Bordeaux. If you tried, you'd be in for a rude shock. On a Friday and Saturday night, Yates's would be crammed with people getting uproariously drunk on anything but wine. Even during the dark days, however, there were places serving good quality wine and food, and some of them are still around. What the newer places offer is sharper cookery and more adventurous wines, many of which are available by the glass thanks to the wonders of Enomatic machines or the Coravin (a sort of handheld Enomatic that dispenses a tasting measure and then seals the bottle with an inert gas). So I thought it would be interesting to examine the now-thriving wine bar sector in London. I've tried to group them roughly in order of opening, so you go from very old school to bang up to date. —Henry Jeffreys

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