Wylie Dufresne: Poached Egg

Wylie makes a Slow Poached Egg with Chorizo Emulsion, Pickled Beets and Dried Olives.

Wylie makes a Slow Poached Egg with Chorizo Emulsion, Pickled Beets and Dried Olives.

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[MUSIC] I'm Wylie Dufresne a chef here at WD~50 down on Clinton Street in Manhattan. Today we're going to do our slow poached egg with chorizo emulsion, Pickled beets and dried olives. And it starts off with cooking the eggs which we've done previously in an immersion circulator at about 70 degrees Celsius for 15 minutes. An immersion circulator is a machine for controlling the temperature of a water bath. And it circulates the water so that there are no blind spots. So that the water is evenly heated and the same temperature throughout the cooking process and we've done that. We've cooked these eggs previously and then we've cooled them down and hopefully we'll maintain a nice shape when I crack them open. And with that, we've taken some Spanish teriso and we've diced it up and we've rendered it in a pan. And then we've strained out the rendered fat, put the chorizo into a blender with a little bit of water, some grapeseed oil. We've turned that on, pureed it together. Then we've poured the rendered chorizo fat back into the blender. And then at the very last second, we've added a poached egg, one of these poached eggs. We take the ones cracked. What we've done is we've made an emotion. And this is a technique that we do with the number of different things. We will puree say, tarragon and then we'll add a little bit of oil to the blanch tarragon and then we'll finish it with an egg. It's a very nice way to make a condiment. It can be spread on a sandwich. It can be use as a sauce for a dish. It's very versatile, very easy as long as you have a blender and you have some cooked eggs. Then we have some candy cane beets, some striped beets, which have just been roasted, then they've been peeled. And on top of that, we pour a pickling brine, a very simple solution, sugar, water, salt, and some various aromatics. And then we allow it to cool at least overnight. Lastly, we have the dried olive element, and that comes in two forms. We've taken kalamata olives that we've pitted, rinsed, and then we've placed into the dehydrator overnight. Very crispy, this is a technique that we owe a debt to Michelle [UNKNOWN] for. This was his idea. But we've then taken the dried olive, and blended it with a modified starch called tapioca maltodextrin. It has the ability to more or less absorb twice its own weight in oil. What we realized was that it could absorb so much oil, that we could take something like olives obviously which have a high Oil content and we could blend them with the tapioca Maltodextrin and get a powder. Something very light but that has the flavor of olives. And when you put it in your mouth it sort of turns back into a paste. And we've made it with several flavors. Here we have the same idea with ham. We've taken Serrano ham. Died it in the oven, left as much of the fat on as possible, and then blended that with the tapioca malt evection. We get a very nice, light, crunchy powder that tastes of ham. And we've done it with any number of fats, from foie gras fat, to bacon fat, olive oil. Olive oil powder is wonderful. t turns back into olive oil in your mouth. It has a fantastic texture. Sort of runs right down your throat, very nice. We have a little bit of chive points as our final garnish. So typically what we would do is we would take these eggs and we would just warm them up. You can warm them up in a little bit of water from the teapot. 155, 160 degrees Farenheit is plenty. We're not looking to cook the egg any further. We're just looking to warm it back up, cuz it's already been cooked. And then what we'll do, is we'll crack them into the bowl. [BLANK_AUDIO] Can see the shape, has a nice set shape of the white, and inside is a yolk, also, that's partially cooked. Take a little bit of the chorizo puree. Place it onto the plate. Take our egg out. Get any residual water that's in the bowl. Place out egg on the plate. Just a pinch of salt on top of the egg. We're just gonna garnish it up, a little but of dry olive, both sides. A bit of the olive powder almost to conceal the dried olive as a sort of pleasant surprise underneath. A couple of pieces of pickled beet and lastly some chive points cascading off the egg. This is an appetizer here at the restaurant and it certainly is quite easy and quite popular. [MUSIC]
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Wylie Dufresne: Poached Egg


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