Wylie Dufresne: Ingredients

Wylie shares his take on foie gras, balsamic vinegar pebbles, and other unique ingredients used at wd-50.

Wylie shares his take on foie gras, balsamic vinegar pebbles, and other unique ingredients used at wd-50.

Read the transcript of this video
[MUSIC] Hi, Wylie Dufresne from WD50, down here on Clinton Street on Lower Eastside Manhattan. Thought we would show you some of the different we use these specialty ingredients as well as some of the equipment in the kitchen to take. Again very familiar flavors and tastes, and manipulate them in unusual fun interesting ways. We use our dehydrator a lot. We buy a home version it's about $150 you can have a dehydrator. And it has several trays that take both dry and wet ingredients and you can put them in there for short periods of time or days on end. And get some really interesting results. Here we have capers that have just been rinsed lightly and then they go right in to the dehydrator overnight and they come out and they're very Crunchy. But because they've been rinsed, they're not overly salty. This could be used in a number of ways. With caviar, serve it as garnishing a hard boiled egg or a soft poached egg. Any place you would expect to find a caper, you have another nice, unusual textural way of reading it. We've done the same thing with lichees. We've taken lichees. We've rinsed them off. Here we've put them into a bag and cyrovaced them with a little bit of compary. And then we've put them in the dehydrator on a tray for about four and a half, five hours. Just to sort of begin to pull the moisture out of them. Like this they're almost like a fruit roll up, for lack of a better term. They've still got a little bit of chew to them but they're delicious. The sweetness of the lychee offsets the bitterness of the Campari and you can really get some interesting results with dried and semi dried fruits. Particularly some fruits that have a nice sugar content like a date. Or lychee. Some other things that we've dried again using some of these chemicals is we've taken peanut butter and what we've done is blended the peanut butter with some water and some methyl cellulose. Methyl cellulose is a gum, a hydrocolloid that is made from tree pulp. We've taken it, mixed the water To make the peanut butter spreadable. Some of the methylcellulose, we heated it all up, cooled it back down, and then we spread it on a sil bad and dried in in the oven, and what we've got is we've got a piece of peanut butter that's now crunchy. And what's fun about that is you don't typically think of things that are fatty as being crunchy, but here you are experiencing it in a different texture. Same taste, but crunchy. Along the same lines, we've taken hibiscus. Typically you see it as a tea. And we've taken that and we've mixed it with three kinds of sugar. We spread it out and we dry it overnight. And then what you get, it's very beautiful, almost like a stained glass and it's a nice way to take a flavored liquid And turn it into a garnish. We serve this with [UNKNOWN] that we serve on top of a puree of popcorn, which again, is another fun, unusual way of experiencing a familiar flavor. We just take popcorn. No salt, no flavor, nothing added. Pop it in the microwave. Then you put it in the blender with a little bit of water and some melted butter. You puree it up. At the very last second, you drop a poached egg into the blender. Again, a very familiar flavor, but in an unfamiliar texture. And it's really quite fun. [MUSIC]
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Wylie Dufresne: Ingredients


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