Sydney’s Best Korean and Chinese Restaurants

Chef Neil Perry, who launched his Australian restaurant empire with Sydney’s Rockpool in 1989, takes Food & Wine editor in chief Dana Cowin on a tour of the Asian enclaves that have inspired his cooking.

Chef Neil Perry, who launched his Australian restaurant empire with Sydney’s Rockpool in 1989, takes Food & Wine editor in chief Dana Cowin on a tour of the Asian enclaves that have inspired his cooking. Here, three of the chef’s top picks for Korean and Chinese food in Sydney.

Read the transcript of this video
Sydney has become one of the world's most exciting and eclectic food destinations. Culinary pioneer Neil Perry of Rockpool has transformed Australian cuisine, and trained the next generation of Australia's top chefs. And he agreed to take me to the Chinatown and Koreatown restaurants that have inspired his cooking. First stop, a Korean restaurant called NaruOne. The wonderful thing about NaruOne is that it's really a working man's cafe. Korean workers to eat some beautiful, cheap food that's great flavor and to them very authentic. Doenjang, the bean paste, Mm-hm. With the chili flakes. Mm-hm. So it's hot and spicy. Naru's quite famous for their Korean fried chicken. It is fried super crisp, and then it's put in the Gochujang paste with sugars and honey. And you get this really wonderful sticky, hot, sweet, salty chicken. Juicy. And that will be really hot, caramel. Hot. Caramel. It smells good. [MUSIC] Next stop, another Korean restaurant called Danjee. We're really going to danger here because then do fantastic barbecue and they do my favorite raw beef dish which is the classic Korean tartare They freeze the meat so it's super cold, and that's a textual experience on the tongue. Dungee's beef tar tar is made with egg yolk, pine nuts, pear, maybe some cabbage or carrot, in a sweet sesame dressing. You get that crunchiness, it's cold, it's sweet. So many different things going on. It is so- Shocking, to put this in your mouth and have it so cold. [MUSIC] So we're on our way to Golden Century and the reason I'm taking you there is there's amazing [INAUDIBLE] seafood in the tanks. Abalone, [INAUDIBLE] mud crab, and of course the amazing, amazing king crab. Oh my gosh. Can you believe that? The crab is at least 35 to 40 years old and it weighs seven to eight kilos, and it is a monster. He is the most beautiful creature When you eat them it is like no other crab. The density of the meat, the texture, and of course that brilliant sweetness that it has, it's an amazing privilege eating something like that. [SOUND] You get three courses of the King Crab. We have salt and pepper and you have This velvety ginger. The salt and pepper crab is incredibly simple. They're just coated in flour, and salt, and pepper and it's fried. That smells so incredibly good. So beautiful. That meat looks so perfectly cooked. And then, this sort of juxtaposition of steaming it and mixing it with the ginger [INAUDIBLE] so it's a little tiny bit of [INAUDIBLE] wine, a little sugar, soy, a little bit of stock. It's a really wonderful way of creating two different textures within the same really wonderful crab. I feel this is such an amazing tour. I love seeing from the average Korean club and then going to the Wanjee, just one step Guests. Just shows you that Chinese food is a really important part of Australian fabric. And I'm proud of this cuz I loved it. I know it's beautiful thank you. Thank you. [MUSIC] [BLANK_AUDIO]
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Sydney’s Best Korean and Chinese Restaurants


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