Steve Raichlen: Tuscan T-Bones

Grilling master Steve Raichlen makes Tuscan T-Bones at the 2008 Food & Wine Classic in Aspen.

Grilling master Steve Raichlen makes Tuscan T-Bones at the 2008 Food & Wine Classic in Aspen.

Read the transcript of this video
[MUSIC] This is a dish that I actually created for the tv show, but it's inspired by the classic Tuscan dish, [UNKNOWN] a la Florentia, Florentine style steak. This is a T-bone, it's called a T-bone why? Because it has a T-shaped bone separating the New York strip from the beef tenderloin, so it's really, it's a great steak for people who like their cake, as it were, and to eat it too. Yet two very different cuts of meat. One other point that's sort of interesting, the classic t-bone only has a little tiny piece of filet mignon on it. The porterhouse actually is cut from deeper into the animal and you get a bigger piece of tenderloin, but the New York strip part is not quite as tender. We're gonna season each with coarse Sea salt right before we go on the grill and I'm often asked, should you let your steak warm to room temperature before you grill it? And my feeling is absolutely not, I've never seen a steak house that leaves raw meat out at room temperature for any amount of time. The heat, your grill's gonna be somewhere between 650 and 800 degrees ideally. So believe me, warming it up is not gonna take too long. The second thing I am often asked is What are the seasonings and when should you put them on? I like to go right before the food goes on the grill. If you salt a steak an hour ahead of time what'll happen the salt will draw some of the liquid out. We're gonna go in 45 degree angle to the bars of the grate. Steak this thick about one and a half minutes. Give a quarter turn, then we start to see little drops of blood pearling on the surface, turn it over. One and a half minutes, quarter turn, one and a half minutes. The idea here is we wanna create a handsome cross hatch of grill marks, which is the badge of honor and signature of master grillsmanship. So the last preparation here, what we're gonna do is extra virgin olive oil, we're going to fry garlic And thinly sliced jalapeno chilis and chopped fresh cilantro, and then this mixture will go on top of our steaks. I often like to add wood chips. To add a smoky flavor, two ways to handle wood chips. These are oak chips. You can toss them on the coals dry, in which case you'll get a kind of a light wood smoke flavor. Or for more heavy kind of traditional barbecue flavor You fold the wood chips over. With a sharp knife or a pencil, simply poke a few holes in top. We've made, in effect, what's called a smoker pouch. So this would go under the grate, over one of your burners, under the meat. It would release a smoke flavor, which would be delectable. So these are the steaks, and testing the doneness of the steak, we use the poke test, the okay test, what the heck's that mean. Everybody give me the okay sign. Press the fleshy pad at the base of your thumb, soft and squishy. That's a rare steak. Move it over to your middle finger, Gently yielding, that's a medium rare steak. Move it over one, kinda semi-firm but just a little yield, that's a medium steak. And finally, the baby finger, hard and springy, that is a well done steak. I imagine not too many people in this crowd would do a well done steak. Okay, so once you have your screaming hot mixture over here, we'll just simply Spoon the the jalapenos, garlic and oil over our Tuscan T-bones. [APPLAUSE]
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Steve Raichlen: Tuscan T-Bones


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