Phet Schwader's Sticky Rice with Bang Bang Sauce

Phet Schwader demonstrates how to make sticky rice and Bang Bang Sauce, his version of a traditional Laotian hot sauce called jeow sohm.

Phet Schwader demonstrates how to make sticky rice and Bang Bang Sauce, his version of a traditional Laotian hot sauce called jeow sohm.

Read the transcript of this video
[MUSIC] Hi, my name's Soulayphet Schwader. This is my mom, Soubanh Whitson. I'm the chef-owner of Khe-Yo restaurant in New York City. We're here making some traditional Laotian dishes for our Lao New Year's menu. The next dish that we're gonna be doing is sticky rice. What we do here, we have a traditional sticky rice steamer. So what we do is we steam it for about 15 to 20 minutes. And then when it gets close to being done, you can kinda look at the rice kernels and see that they're almost separating out. And what we do is we flip it. And then we let it go for about another couple minutes, so the top can cook. When the rice is done, what we do, we take the rice. Take it out of the basket and we just let the steam out. Because if we don't have to steam out, the rice->> The rice will steam inside the rice basket. It's gonna be soggy. The next dish is the Bang Bang sauce. We call it [FOREIGN] from my language Chilis, garlic, sugar, fish sauce, and cilantro. The goal with making bang bang is to keep it balanced, and it's important you do the sugar together with the chilis and garlic just to help it mash up in the wooden pestle. This dish for me That's a good start to a meal. It's wakes you up it kind pinch you in the face a little bit which is good. sticky rice, meant to be eat by your hands. We try to tell people at the restaurant it's easier actually to eat with your hands. Take a little ball It acts like little utilises. You'll know [UNKNOWN] if you eat [UNKNOWN] with your hands. If you eat with a utilise your not [UNKNOWN].
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Phet Schwader's Sticky Rice with Bang Bang Sauce


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