Making, Rolling, and Forming Pie Dough

Jacques Pépin makes perfect pie dough.

Jacques Pépin makes perfect pie dough.

Read the transcript of this video
There is nothing more useful and classic, in fact, than a pie dough. You can use it for so many different type of things. Sometime I do it with butter and some lard, especially if I do like a quiche, when you have bacon in it, and so forth, and the lard really give it a great deal of flakiness. Often, however, I do it just with butter. And when I measure the flour, I go directly in the bin like this, and equalize it with a knife. Now this is important, because three cup of flour done this way is about a pound. If you sift that pound of flour, you'll probably have three cups and a half. That irate it when you sift it. So here I have a cup and a half of flour, a little dash of salt, dash of sugar. That's it. And the butter. Now the butter here, I have about 4, 5 ounce of butter. And I could let it turn in the machine long enough s that the moisture in the butter would be practically enough to [UNKNOWN] the dough. Get it together. If however, I process it only A little bit so that I can still see the piece of butter then I will have to add water. If I do that I will have some of the flakiness, the flakiness that I get in a puff paste if the butter is still apparent. [SOUND] See if I do it this way you could see that if I get that dough here I'm going to have pieces of butter all over the place. And that the principle of a puff paste where the dough is separated from the butter. It's just [UNKNOWN] layer. But this is not exactly the same but, a little bit. So there I will put some water. And again, the amount of the water depend on how much you incorporate the flour and the butter together. Yeah, probably like three tablespoon, three, four, that's it. [SOUND] Just a couple of pulsings this way. I want to grab it with my hand. I want to be able to hold it together this way. That's enough. So the dough is not completely incorporated, as you can see here, and that's what I want. I will get flakiness out of that dough. It will be tender and flaky. I'll get that dough together and I can see that it's holding together and that's what I want. And I will use, of course, a little bit of flour to roll it. Now, a lot of people tell you to let the dough rest. We know when you process it so minimally I did, you don't really have to let it rise. Okay. This. See it doesn't have much elasticity because I have not worked it out with water. What I'm saying is that you can work flour and butter together and it doesn't get elastic. It's only by the time you put the water in, that it develop the gluten and it become elastic. Th ultimate dough this way is a bread dough. Water and flour. The ultimate dough at the other end of the spectrum is a cookie dough. Flour and butter. This one is somewhat in the middle I can see here. And I can see the strip of butter throughout. I can see butter throughout. Here. What you want to do now, you want to roll your dough directly on your rolling pin. And unmold it the other way. Meaning that this was the part which was on the table before that is the part with the flour. There is no flour underneath. Now. Edge it inside. You know you don't. [BLANK_AUDIO] And usually you want to do a bit of a border with a dough. So what you do you grab a little piece of dough and bring it inside so it give you a bit of a ring [BLANK_AUDIO] And then now you can cut the dough with you rolling pin one way and then the other way. [BLANK_AUDIO] Now you have that ring here that you want to Press it so that it look. Nice and neat and, the same all around. [BLANK_AUDIO] Okay. You can cook it this way, you can even mark it with you want with a little bit of, with a fork, or A knife, all around if you wanna get an edge. Now that dough can be filled up with apple or different type of fruit and could directly or sometime we bake blind the dough so cold that either a piece of paper Piece of paper, a piece of aluminum foil. Sometime it hold it, some weight to cook it without anything inside, and then finish it up after.
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Making, Rolling, and Forming Pie Dough


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