Jacques Pépin: Making and Working with Puff Pastry

Jacques Pépin's trips for making flaky puff pastry.

Jacques Pépin's trips for making flaky puff pastry.

Read the transcript of this video
You know puff pastry but feuillete' in France we call that thousand leaves because it goes into tiny leaves. It's probably one of the most challenging dough to do for the chef. It's made of a bread dough if you want water, flour, which you spread then you put butter on to it, you close it, you now have a layer. Of bread dough all around and that layer of fat in the center. That one, two, three, bread dough, fat, bread dough. You roll it into a rectangle. Fold it in thirds, so it's three times three. Actually eight, because where it touches the dough it's still dough. And you do that six times, and you have about 1500 layers of bread dough and butter. Which, when you put into the oven. The bread dough, the water in the bread dough develop into steam. It kind of waterproof by the butter and it kind of developing into the multilayer effect you have in napoleon, [UNKNOWN] and so forth. A pound of flour and about eight to ten ounces of water depend on the humidity [BLANK_AUDIO] Okay. That would be my detente. [BLANK_AUDIO] So this is if you want your bread dough of course without yeast. Actually if we put yeast in it and you roll it like a puff paste you have croissant. The croissant is the mixture Of puff paste. If you want and buy yours, that is if that dough roll like the puff paste, but there is yeast in it. [BLANK_AUDIO] Okay. [BLANK_AUDIO] So now we have to extend this, usually you let it rest in between. There is about three or four different ways that I make puff paste The classic way, most classic of all, is really to do a square of the detente. Then you have a square of the butter in the center and you bring the four corners together and you start rolling. Here I do it slightly different. It goes faster and I think the result is just as good. I will expand that dough. [BLANK_AUDIO] Don't be afraid to use flour here at that moment, it's okay. [BLANK_AUDIO] Into A long rectangle like this. That's why you have a pound of flour here, and add like three quarters of a pound of butter. You can ago up to a pound of butter, and I will arrange that butter on like not quite to the end over there. [BLANK_AUDIO] About the equal amount all over. So what you do here, you bring back the third of the dough which is not covered with any butter on top. And then you fold that again on top. It means, to a certain extent, you already have several layers, so that gave you time. [SOUND] Okay. Now we give it the first turn. [BLANK_AUDIO] I can see that my dough is still rollable. Doesn't have much elasticity yet. So I can break it down a little bit like this. The first couple of dough are the most important, that equalize the butter all over the place. You can see through the dough, both layer of butter here. [BLANK_AUDIO] Yeah. [BLANK_AUDIO] Now, it is the time to do the turn There is two types of turn here, a single turn or a double turn. You wanna make sure that you have no flour in the center of it so you wanna brush it out. [BLANK_AUDIO] If I fold it in three, I go here. Bring that here. That gives me three layers. One, two, three. That's a single turn. I wanna do a double turn. We do occasionally. Again to go faster, I go in the center here. Make sure that it's sealed nicely. Again, in the center here [BLANK_AUDIO] Brush it with any dough. Gonna make sure that's it together. And fold it this way. This is one, two, three, four, rather than three dough. So it's actually one and a half turn. The puff base should have six turn. Six single turn or if you want four turn and a half. That puff base is ready. One, two, three, four, five, six turn. You mark it so you remember it. Often at the last turn here we roll it in sugar to do a pig's ear or to do all kind of different dessert that you do. But the technique is basically the same way, whether it's sugar or flour. [BLANK_AUDIO] So. See, you can see that it's nice together. Dough is beautiful. [BLANK_AUDIO] So, let me take. A piece of this. And there's how to see the layer here of course. Because after 1600 layer that's 1500 layer. But they are there. [BLANK_AUDIO] Okay, they can be rolled or they fit in many different shapes [BLANK_AUDIO] One of them, certainly is. When you take this, and you brush it with eggs and a mixture of paprika and parmesan cheese. You brush it on top to do cheese strobe. Then you fold it. You know, so that you can cut it. [BLANK_AUDIO] Let's say one, two. Just to show you that this, you will have it to do cheese straw. We can have your cheese straw that you cook in your cookie sheet. And at the end of it, when you eaten them, remember now they're covered with one thing or another. You crush the end of it here and the end of it here so that they don't shrink. Another way to do a sacristan you take one this way. You put your hand here, your other hand here, and you do this. And that, you have what we call a secristan. And again, you cook them in the long way. You crunch the end here and you crunch the end here, so they don't move while they are cooking. And then the short which is pretty common would be to do langer secristan like this. Again, roll in sugar. You fold it in half. You cut it in the center, and you bring that here to cook it this way. So you've seen those shapes. And then we will give a double turn. There. And now this way. And again this way. Turn it a couple more times. This. Now when you wanna do. Pigs ear. You can take a piece like that again in sugar. [SOUND] Roll it into your sugar. Fold this here, one time, at least two time, to where we are here. One time, two time, there is place for another time here. Another one here. Fold them in half. Now you put that in the refrigerator, the log. And when it's nice and cold, of course, you cut it into those things that we call pigs ear. You put them to be cooked on the tray. And you twist the end of it. So they're spread out because remember now that the puff space is in that direction, 32 spread out this way. If you want to do a tart, a square tart which we often do. So, let's say you want to do this type of tart again, you brush it with eggs, you fold it in half like this, and they type which is folded here, you cut it this way, the other one This way. Then you reopen it again brush it, you bring that part here. That would be your edge. And that other part here which will be your other edge to do a square puff paste [UNKNOWN] some large ones and smaller ones Of course there is the classic [FOREIGN] that we sell as a garnish to many things. Certainly to fish and that [UNKNOWN] garnish. These of course Are rolled in sugar, all of the the different shapes, and baked on either parchment paper or one of those silicon no-stick mats. And this is a few things you can do with a puff pastry.
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Jacques Pépin: Making and Working with Puff Pastry


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