Jacques Pépin: Hard-Cooked Eggs

Jacques Pépin perfects hard-boiled eggs.

Jacques Pépin perfects hard-boiled eggs.

Read the transcript of this video
One of the greatest thing to eat is eggs. Hundreds of recipe, curdle eggs, scramble, fried, saute, hard-cooked eggs and saute. And any country in the world usually can afford eggs and most of the protein in many countries come from eggs. When I cook a hard-cooked egg on the round part of the eggs I make a hole here. With a pin because there's an air chamber. I put that in boiling water, the pressure is released so my eggs never crack in the water. This is a raw egg. If I spin it like this it doesn't spin because it is liquid inside. That egg is cooked Go and see if I spin it, it will basically stand up, because it's totally solid. You got it. [LAUGH] Now one of the best ways to peel the eggs is underwater, because what you have to do after you crack the egg, you have to go through the shell, and there is a There is a little skin underneath. You have to go under that skin so the water goes under that skin. When the water goes under the skin, under running water, it makes it easy to peel. That egg is all cooked, and it's all cooked properly because you don't see any green Around the yolk, Why? Because all the eggs goes into water. The sulfur in the egg white goes throughout the center of the egg. And it's not the physical reaction with the iron in the egg yolk will give you that green tinge. So after that the egg is cooked You lift it out of the water, drop it in the ice cold water. Do it for like 30 seconds, long enough for the cold to go inside. The sulfur feels it and cross the egg white and dissipate in the water. So that's very important. 10 minute. 10 minute egg. About nine, nine, 10 minute depending on the size of it.
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Jacques Pépin: Hard-Cooked Eggs


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