Jacques Pépin: Cutting, Washing and Julienning a Leek

Jacques Pépin: how to prep leeks.

Jacques Pépin: how to prep leeks.

Read the transcript of this video
I love leek. There is nothing like leek and potato soup. When you buy a leek and sometime they can be expensive, all you discard is that part. Then look at the outside like this. Maybe the first one is kind of tough. All you see it's dirty so I would remove that. Actually I wash that and keep it for stock. The second leaf is Down to about here. The third one down to about here. The fourth one here. Maybe the fifth one and so forth. I mean, the idea is to go into the leek when it become lighter in color, not really to remove all of this. This is expensive. Then you wanna wash it. You open it in usually four going, or six, like this to expose the center. It's really in the center that you will see that you have the dirt, that's it. So then, you wanna wash it. Wash it under cold water. You do it in the sink, it's very good. The tips and leaves you have to wash it and even when you wash it, after you slice it don't put that in to a colander. If I were have to put in my hand in the bottom of this, there's a fair amount of dirt there. So you use the leek in different way, You can look it this way, again the same flattening technique that we've done. That would be for soup, that would be for stew. [SOUND] And as you can see, it could be the light green or the dark green. Often with the white of the leek here, we do what we call a Julienne. What you do you cut the leek in half. This has been organized by mother nature, while you can except the root. So that is all separated so you don't disturb it you fold it in half, and then from this side here [NOISE] You slice it. [BLANK_AUDIO] Into what we call a julienne, that is a long strip, those long strips, which we use a great deal in what I am cooking in the julienne oblique.
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Jacques Pépin: Cutting, Washing and Julienning a Leek


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