Inside Hong Kong's Wan Chai Wet Market

Hong Kong’s wet markets offer a glimpse into the vibrant and timeless world of grocery shopping before the existence of modern supermarkets.

Hong Kong’s wet markets offer a glimpse into the vibrant and timeless world of grocery shopping before the existence of modern supermarkets. These markets are composed of stalls that sell live fish, fresh meat, fruit and vegetables, specialty items such as salted duck eggs, quail eggs, fresh rice and egg noodles and tofu; as well as delicious cooked food items including roasted duck, bbq pork, roasted sweet potatoes and chestnuts, dumplings and steamed buns to name a few available options. The wet markets are called wet markets due to the frequent floor washing required when selling meat and fish. I love exploring Hong Kong’s wet markets to glimpse inside the lives of locals on their daily grocery run, and to browse the wide variety of incredibly fresh meat, fish and produce while snacking on delicious local food items. The sights, sounds, smells, hustle and bustle are a thrilling sensory overload. The outdoor street markets are disappearing and moving into big air-conditioned buildings, so next time you’re in Hong Kong, I highly recommend stopping by an outdoor wet market; they’re more fun. We take a walk through the Wan Chai wet market, a busy street market that is definitely worth a visit.—Deana Saukam of Faim Fatale (@faimfatale) and F&W's Around the World Network

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Inside Hong Kong's Wan Chai Wet Market