For a long time, Peckham was notorious among Londoners primarily for its gang violence, bad schools and decaying housing estates. Until recently, this unloved part of South East London didn't even have the urban glamour of other rough neighborhoods like Brixton or Hackney; there was just no reason to go there. Then, about ten years ago, artists who had been pushed out of East London by rising rents began colonizing the neighborhood's old industrial buildings, and soon people with money began moving in. The usual story really, but in Peckham it happened so fast. Seemingly overnight, SE15 went from being a postcode I wouldn't even consider moving to, to one I couldn't afford.   Peckham has certain advantages over other gentrifying suburbs. It was developed in the 19th century for the newly affluent middle classes and it still has lots of good quality (albeit increasingly expensive) Victorian houses. There's large park in the form of Peckham Rye. And it's well-connected: from the beautiful if dilapidated Italianate station at Peckham Rye, you can catch trains to all over London. The schools are improving with independently run public schools getting outstanding results.   The best thing about Peckham, though, is the food. I live in nearby Lewisham, which is still stubbornly resisting gentrification and some of its trappings, like good restaurants. So whenever we want to eat or drink well, we go to Peckham. Despite all the great restaurants, even on a Friday night, it's not that busy. The bridge and tunnel crowd haven't discovered the neighborhood yet—unless you count my wife and me. Here are a few places to try.  —Henry Jeffreys 

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