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Gary Vaynerchuk’s mother, Tamara, makes Stove Top stuffing every Thanksgiving, and he proudly admits loving it. Its simplicity inspired this recipe by F&W’s Grace Parisi. Using homemade turkey stockgives it a rich flavor, but for a shortcut, use chicken broth instead.

Since stuffing is one of the most popular parts of a Thanksgiving meal, try doing it as fun little hors d'oeuvre bites.

After tossing the ingredients and spreading them in a pan, Melissa Rubel Jacobson chills the stuffing for at least an hour before baking. This ensures that the bread soaks up the liquid—key to a stuffing that's crisp on top and moist within.

To save time, you can substitute 3 pounds of store-bought plain or chile corn bread for the Country Corn Bread.

A mix of sautéed wild mushrooms adds lots of texture to this stuffing; lemon juice and zest make it tangy. The mushroom stuffing can be made vegetarian-friendly simply by replacing the chicken stock with vegetable stock.

In this bread stuffing, Barbara Lynch relies on thick-sliced bacon and a mix of wild mushrooms to provide the robust, earthy flavors she thinks belong in every stuffing.

Chef John Besh says, “This is the only dish worthy of both Thanksgiving and Christmas dinner at our house.” Why? Because it’s unbelievably delicious—a bready dressing that’s spicy, crispy and nicely briny.

This corn bread dressing includes plenty of brussels sprouts, so it’s like two classic Thanksgiving side dishes in one.

This stuffing is slightly sweet and fragrant, with plenty of herbs. There's no meat in it, so it's a little bit lighter and fresher-tasting than stuffings made with sausage.

This recipe makes enough to stuff a turkey and fill a casserole. Use five cups for the cavity and the skin flap at the top of the breast, then cook the rest in an 8-by-11-inch baking dish.

Rather than traditional sausage stuffing, chef George Mendes of NYC’s Aldea serves a smoky version using chorizo and hot pimentón de la Vera (smoked paprika).

When Suzanne Goin was a child, making stuffing for the holidays was one of her first forays into cooking. “My mom always used store-bought crumbs, and it became my job to doctor them up,” says Goin. “I’d just raid the spice cabinet and the first batches were a little crazy. But I figured out what I liked best.” This chestnut-laced stuffing with pancetta and fennel is adapted from Sunday Suppers at Lucques. The crispy olive oil-soaked bread cubes on top are especially delectable.

The stuffing can be assembled and refrigerated overnight. Bring to room temperature before baking.

Joanne Chang says, “A Chinese meal isn’t complete without rice; Thanksgiving isn’t complete without stuffing. This sticky-rice dressing combines the best of both worlds.” Chinese sausage makes the rice deliciously sweet and savory. Chang likes using the Kam Yen Jan brand, which has no MSG; look for it at Asian markets.

Andouille, a spicy sausage made from pork chitterlings and tripe, adds a wonderful smoky note to the sweet corn bread stuffing.


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