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Collards are often paired with bacon, but our new favorite twist is to flavor the greens with spicy pepperoni.

This superfresh, crunchy salad stars very thinly sliced golden beets, which have a sweet, earthy flavor.

F&W’s Kay Chun uses hearty mustard greens to make this crunchy, bright and tangy salad.

This rich and delicious creamed kale from star chef Tyler Florence is an excellent swap for more traditional creamed spinach.

Crisp fried shallots are a terrific contrast to creamy greens, especially when they’re stirred in and sprinkled on top.

This is a Southern interpretation of French creamed spinach. The collards add a pleasant bitterness to this lush side dish, but it’s important to shred them finely before you simmer them in the cream or they’ll never get tender.

This pan-fried broccoli rabe is a pleasant departure from the standard version made with garlic and chiles, though it does include those ingredients. Ryan Hardy mixes the garlic and chiles, along with fennel, into a satisfying tomato sauce that balances the bitter greens and adds lovely color, too.

Bake the greens in individual dishes for a more sophisticated presentation.

The array of bitter greens, lightly wilted by hot garlic oil, is delicious with the flavors of balsamic vinegar and sweet quince paste in the dressing. Chef Govind Armstrong recommends using a soft blue like Gorgonzola for making a creamy dish. The firm blue cheese here creates a more crumbly topping.

This luscious side dish can be prepared up to three days ahead. The duo of sweet parsnip and creamy spinach is unbeatable.

This salad is the perfect blend of flavors—bitter (watercress, arugula), tart (pomegranate seeds) and sweet (honey and pear).

“I often use just one or two spices, such as the ginger and cumin in this Swiss chard,” says Madhur Jaffrey. “It’s a very northern Indian approach.”

Delicious and easy to make and serve, this frittata-like casserole is just the kind of dish that F&W’s Justin Chapple likes to serve as a first course at dinner parties. He slices the baked casserole into bite-size squares and tops them with a dollop of crème fraïche to serve with cocktails.

Just a little red wine vinegar transforms this otherwise familiar bowl of garlicky greens.

Chef Sam Hayward usually tops these lush onion-sweetened greens with an excellent aged raw-milk cheese from Vermont called Tarentaise. He says Gruyère or any other Alpine-style cheese is a great substitute.


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