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  • 1 of 22

    Ground pork, rice, bell peppers, and shiitake mushrooms are cooked in a single pan and flavored with soy sauce, lime juice, and cayenne. Quick, delicious, and easy to clean up after—what more could you want in a dish?

  • 2 of 22

    These deliciously spiced grilled chicken skewers are perfect with a sweet-and-tangy peanut sauce.

  • 3 of 22

    Pairing Suggestion: This salad calls for a sparkling wine that can cut through the rich duck and work with the tart papaya, such as cava from Spain.

  • 4 of 22

    Nigel Slater says, "The first recipe I cooked on television was this green curry. I presented it in a beautiful brass bowl I bought in Thailand. And I was so pleased with it. But my dishwasher, who is Thai, looked at it and said, 'Why did you put the food in that brass bowl? That's a bowl we use for bathing.'"

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  • 5 of 22

    Top Chef winner Harold Dieterle's feel-good Thai coconut soup is flavored with chiles, ginger and lemongrass, and garnished with plenty of shrimp.

  • 6 of 22

    According to Tom Colicchio, "Radishes are the unsung heroes of the vegetable world." He has been passionate about them ever since he was a kid in Elizabeth, New Jersey, where he'd pick them from his grandfather's small garden. "Radishes add texture, spice and color," he says. "I was featuring them in dishes at Gramercy Tavern almost 20 years ago, back when no one else was. Radishes are one of those ingredients that I always use when summer rolls around." Here, he tosses them with watermelon, chiles and an Asian fish sauce dressing for a refreshing salad.

  • 7 of 22

    This is a great, fast version of American-style pad thai, with an appealing combination of sweet, sour and spicy flavors. Look for the noodles in the Asian section of markets.

  • 8 of 22

    At Thai restaurants, Tom Mylan usually requests a double order of larb (or laab), an addictive appetizer of ground meat spiked with chiles, lime juice and fish sauce and served with lettuce leaves for wrapping.

  • 9 of 22

    Our version of pad Thai, the satisfying rice-noodle dish from Thailand, is made with chicken, tofu, bean sprouts, and, in place of rice noodles, linguine. The fish sauce is available at Asian markets and keeps forever. If you like, you can use a mixture of soy sauce and oyster sauce instead. Lime wedges make a nice final touch.

  • 10 of 22

    Chris Yeo sautés the okra pods in hot oil until they're browned and crisp, then stir-fries them with chile sauce and pungent dried shrimp (widely available in Asian markets).

  • 11 of 22
  • 12 of 22

    Pino Maffeo serves his vibrant, spicy, warming stew with gai lan (Chinese broccoli). Sautéed garlic chives stud his plump potato dumplings. In this simplified recipe, baby bok choy, an easy-to-find Chinese green, replaces the gai lan, while regular chives substitute for the garlic chives.

  • 13 of 22

    A refreshing starter or light main course, Sang Yoon's Thai take on a Latin American classic is a perfect balance of crunchy, tender, sweet, hot and tart.

  • 14 of 22

    A nutty paste does double duty as a rub and a sauce for these grilled lamb chops from meat master Bruce Aidells.

  • 15 of 22

    Any leftover marinated steak is perfect for serving over a salad or in sandwiches.

  • 16 of 22

    To create completely satisfying dishes, Thai cooks aim for a mix of sweet, salty, sour and bitter flavors. In his salad, chef Laurent Tourondel achieves that alluring combination by tossing tart green mango with cucumbers, a myriad of fresh herbs, a vibrant Thai dressing and plenty of delicate, sweet crabmeat.

  • 17 of 22

    The classic flavors of Thai cuisine—sweet, salty, spicy, sour—can all be found in the dressing on this salad, a delicious tangle of chewy rice noodles, shrimp, squid and peanuts.

  • 18 of 22

    An abundance of whole basil leaves joins chicken and fiery red chiles for a quick, delicious, and decidedly spicy stir-fry. Holy basil is the most authentic choice, but any variety will do.

  • 19 of 22

    Mai Pham gives a twist to this Thai street-food staple by adding bok choy and replacing the usual pork, chicken or beef with shrimp.

  • 20 of 22
  • 21 of 22

    "Thailand is condiment heaven, with a gazillion sauces. This northern Thai-style one is extra-sour, because it uses both tamarind and lime," says Naomi Duguid.

  • 22 of 22

    For this Thai classic, Andy Ricker uses a mortar and pestle to pound crunchy raw green beans with a piquant mix of chiles, garlic, fish sauce and lime juice. He then tosses in crisp strips of unripened papaya.

Ground pork, rice, bell peppers, and shiitake mushrooms are cooked in a single pan and flavored with soy sauce, lime juice, and cayenne. Quick, delicious, and easy to clean up after—what more could you want in a dish?

These deliciously spiced grilled chicken skewers are perfect with a sweet-and-tangy peanut sauce.

Pairing Suggestion: This salad calls for a sparkling wine that can cut through the rich duck and work with the tart papaya, such as cava from Spain.

Nigel Slater says, "The first recipe I cooked on television was this green curry. I presented it in a beautiful brass bowl I bought in Thailand. And I was so pleased with it. But my dishwasher, who is Thai, looked at it and said, 'Why did you put the food in that brass bowl? That's a bowl we use for bathing.'"

Top Chef winner Harold Dieterle's feel-good Thai coconut soup is flavored with chiles, ginger and lemongrass, and garnished with plenty of shrimp.

According to Tom Colicchio, "Radishes are the unsung heroes of the vegetable world." He has been passionate about them ever since he was a kid in Elizabeth, New Jersey, where he'd pick them from his grandfather's small garden. "Radishes add texture, spice and color," he says. "I was featuring them in dishes at Gramercy Tavern almost 20 years ago, back when no one else was. Radishes are one of those ingredients that I always use when summer rolls around." Here, he tosses them with watermelon, chiles and an Asian fish sauce dressing for a refreshing salad.

This is a great, fast version of American-style pad thai, with an appealing combination of sweet, sour and spicy flavors. Look for the noodles in the Asian section of markets.

At Thai restaurants, Tom Mylan usually requests a double order of larb (or laab), an addictive appetizer of ground meat spiked with chiles, lime juice and fish sauce and served with lettuce leaves for wrapping.

Our version of pad Thai, the satisfying rice-noodle dish from Thailand, is made with chicken, tofu, bean sprouts, and, in place of rice noodles, linguine. The fish sauce is available at Asian markets and keeps forever. If you like, you can use a mixture of soy sauce and oyster sauce instead. Lime wedges make a nice final touch.

Chris Yeo sautés the okra pods in hot oil until they're browned and crisp, then stir-fries them with chile sauce and pungent dried shrimp (widely available in Asian markets).

Pino Maffeo serves his vibrant, spicy, warming stew with gai lan (Chinese broccoli). Sautéed garlic chives stud his plump potato dumplings. In this simplified recipe, baby bok choy, an easy-to-find Chinese green, replaces the gai lan, while regular chives substitute for the garlic chives.

A refreshing starter or light main course, Sang Yoon's Thai take on a Latin American classic is a perfect balance of crunchy, tender, sweet, hot and tart.

A nutty paste does double duty as a rub and a sauce for these grilled lamb chops from meat master Bruce Aidells.

Any leftover marinated steak is perfect for serving over a salad or in sandwiches.

To create completely satisfying dishes, Thai cooks aim for a mix of sweet, salty, sour and bitter flavors. In his salad, chef Laurent Tourondel achieves that alluring combination by tossing tart green mango with cucumbers, a myriad of fresh herbs, a vibrant Thai dressing and plenty of delicate, sweet crabmeat.

The classic flavors of Thai cuisine—sweet, salty, spicy, sour—can all be found in the dressing on this salad, a delicious tangle of chewy rice noodles, shrimp, squid and peanuts.

An abundance of whole basil leaves joins chicken and fiery red chiles for a quick, delicious, and decidedly spicy stir-fry. Holy basil is the most authentic choice, but any variety will do.

Mai Pham gives a twist to this Thai street-food staple by adding bok choy and replacing the usual pork, chicken or beef with shrimp.

"Thailand is condiment heaven, with a gazillion sauces. This northern Thai-style one is extra-sour, because it uses both tamarind and lime," says Naomi Duguid.

For this Thai classic, Andy Ricker uses a mortar and pestle to pound crunchy raw green beans with a piquant mix of chiles, garlic, fish sauce and lime juice. He then tosses in crisp strips of unripened papaya.

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