Spiralizing is simple. You can use a vegetable peeler, sharp knife, or the Spiralizer—a shoebox-sized gadget that pushes produce through a set of blades like a hand-cranked mandolin—to turn fresh fruit and vegetables into spirals, shoestrings, ribbons, or noodles.  
There’s a reason this trend has caught on with home cooks. Spiralized vegetables make dishes like our Shaved Zucchini Salad with Parmigiano and Pistachios interesting by introducing texture. Crunchy curls of raw carrots, red peppers, or cabbage are great for Asian and Southern slaws. It can be a time saver as well; spiralized root vegetables like beets or butternut squash cook in the oven in less than fifteen minutes.
Is there a lone piece of produce sitting in your fridge? Are you looking for an easy dinner for one? Pull out the Spiralizer; it spins a single vegetable into a pile of noodles. Those noodles are what put spiralizing on the map and, while we would never give up real pasta, it’s fun to experiment with lighter vegetable noodles. Zucchini spirals into a particularly toothsome yet pliant noodle (or “zoodle”). Try pairing them with bold sauces like Grace Parisi’s velvety butter, lemon thyme, tarragon and Parmesan sauce or our chunky summer tomato marinara.  
Our spiralizer recipes aren’t just about sneaking more nutrients into your meal. We spiralize potatoes into long strands for our extra crispy latkes and grill skewers of summer squash ribbons with prosciutto. 
Scroll through the slideshow for a collection of easy, flavorful recipes that will put your Spiralizer to work, and totally justify the lost counter space.
—Carrie Mullins

More
Food & Wine

You May Like