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At New York City’s Babbo, Mario Batali creates a simple, brilliant version of this classic dish, tossing the long, hollow pasta strands with house-cured guanciale (pork jowl) and a spicy house-made tomato sauce. To make this dish at home, use pancetta, which is simpler to find than guanciale, and buy a good jarred tomato sauce instead of making one.

Mario Batali’s seafood salad combines white beans and chunks of crab with a lively mint oil. The chef frequently makes this dish with poached rock shrimp in place of the crab.

Mario Batali chars his asparagus on the grill, then serves it with a superrich zabaglione sauce spiked with black pepper.

Tortilla española exists in almost every corner of Spain: as a tapa in fancy city restaurants; as a filling for bocadillos (sandwiches) at gas-station cafés; as a main course served on worn metal plates in home kitchens. Mario Batali’s version, based on one he tasted in the Ribera del Duero wine region, is baked until golden brown and offers an especially high ratio of potatoes to eggs.

The classic accompaniment to osso buco is saffron risotto. This simple alternative takes only 15 minutes to prepare.

“This is my take on the Little Italy classic,” says Mario Batali of the sausage and peppers that’s a mainstay of the iconic Manhattan neighborhood and its annual street festival. Stewing the bell peppers in red wine gives them richness; so does a generous garnish of grated pecorino cheese. The stewed sausages and peppers are also delicious tossed with pasta.

A recipe from Mario Batali, from the 2007 Classic in Aspen.

This is Mario Batali’s variation on a classic dish from the coastal villages outside of Trieste, where the fresh seafood is among the most prized in the world. The polenta that accompanies the shrimp must be very soft, almost saucelike. “Thick, lumpy polenta is criminal in that part of Italy, and justly so,” Batali says.

Mario Batali’s Edible Garden, at the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx, is named for two of his restaurants: the Otto Pizza Garden and the Babbo Beets, Garlic and Greens Garden. Cooking demonstrations feature recipes like Batali’s fritters with zucchini and rocambole garlic.

Together, Mario Batali and chef Dave Pasternack created this earthy salad with chopped cured anchovies in the dressing.

When Mario Batali and his friends arrived at Cambados, a coastal village in Galicia, they were put to work harvesting clams. Later at the Vionta Winery, just outside Cambados, Mario built a fire from dried grapevines and corncobs—“for a bit of sweetness”—and grilled lobsters and navajas (razor clams).

Mario Batali advises seeking out Italian mortadella (cured sausage made from ground pork with a smooth, delicate flavor) for these wraps; American-made mortadella, he says, is no better than bologna. He also recommends buying exquisitely milky, creamy fresh robiola cheese, but says that fresh goat cheese or even ricotta would be acceptable stand-ins.

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