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This luscious side dish can be prepared up to three days ahead. The duo of sweet parsnip and creamy spinach is unbeatable.

Holiday Make-Ahead Tip: The potatoes can be baked up to 5 hours ahead; let stand at room temperature. Rewarm in the oven before serving.

Suggested wine pairing: The best bet for this salad is a Sauvignon Blanc with herbal and grapefruit hints, such as those from South Africa or New Zealand.

The genius idea here is pulsing sliced pepperoni with bread crumbs to add a ton of extra flavor and a great crunch to broccoli.

This recipe is as fun to eat as monkey bread (little balls of yeast dough that are baked in a pan together, then pulled apart at the table) but a lot less time-consuming to make. Grace Parisi spreads her buttery biscuit dough with a savory onion-Gruyère mixture, stacks layers of it sideways in a loaf pan, then bakes it until golden and fluffy.

Warm salads used to be common on restaurant menus, but their popularity has waned, for no good reason. This terrific salad is made with warm mushrooms that develop great meaty flavor when cooked with soy sauce.

Inspired by a potato gratin at Restaurant Daniel in New York City, this creamy—but creamless—recipe gets great flavor from thyme and rosemary.

Buying beets with the beet greens still attached is like getting two ingredients in one. To turn them into this fabulous salad, roast the beets until they’re sweet, blanch the greens until they’re tender, then toss both with olive oil, lemon and anchovies.

Blogger Heidi Swanson shares this lightened bread pudding in her cookbook, Super Natural Every Day.

“Blood oranges are part of my Sicily fascination,” Renato Poliafito says. He uses the segments to add color and tang to green beans and reduces the juice with balsamic vinegar to make the dressing.

The combination of pecorino and Parmesan gives these potatoes a great cheesy depth.

This classic is updated with deep-flavored cheddar and a crunchy topping of crumbled crackers and toasted almonds.

John Besh’s decadent cauliflower puree is silky and luscious because it’s made with both cream and butter. Adjust the level of cayenne pepper to make the cauliflower puree more or less spicy.

Curly leaf spinach has great texture and flavor and holds this mustardy dressing well. For additional color, feel free to use a variety of different colored beets. You can also swap blood oranges for the tangerines.

Adding butternut squash and spices is a lovely way to jazz up rice.

Inspired by the pickled pearl onions that became a family tradition (“Mom just served them straight out of the jar and threw a toothpick at them”), Barbara Lynch bakes fresh pearl onions in a mixture of cream, garlic, shallots and bacon, then tops it all with a crispy panko crust.

For this vegetable side, L’Etoile chef Tory Miller's local gin source is Death's Door Spirits in Madison, Wisconsin, a distillery that uses wild juniper berries harvested on Washington Island in Lake Michigan. “I love that they pick all those juniper berries by hand up in Door County,” he says.

This sausage dressing recipe makes enough to stuff a turkey and fill a casserole. Use five cups of stuffing for the cavity and the skin flap at the top of the breast, then cook the rest in an 8-by-11-inch baking dish.


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