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Adding butternut squash and spices is a lovely way to jazz up rice.

This lemon-scented herb salt makes a great seasoning for everything from roasted white fish to grilled chicken and pork to steamed vegetables—and of course, any kind of potato. Grinding the sage, rosemary and thyme into the salt, rather than just stirring it in, helps intensify and meld the flavors.

Dill seeds add a pleasant and unusual flavor to these flaky biscuits, which get their richness from both butter and heavy cream. Quick to make and to bake, the biscuits are best served warm with butter.

Emeril Lagasse sautés radishes and their greens with bacon, shallots and orange juice until they’re perfectly crisp-tender.

New York chef Gerry Hayden, a friend of Michael Mina contributed this side dish to the holiday meal. Everybody fell for the combination of creamy pureed potato and fragrant vanilla.

Kale is a marvelous green for salads because it’s hearty enough to handle hefty ingredients like nuts and meat, plus it doesn’t wilt as it sits on the table. When chef Ryan Hardy makes this kale salad for Thanksgiving dinner, he deep-fries the pecans, but it’s quicker (and less messy) to toast them in the oven.

This super-autumnal dish offers the unusual combination of brussels sprouts and butternut squash, which generally stand on their own as side dishes. The brussels sprout leaves are savory, the chunks of squash are tender and sweet, and the fried sage garnish is pungent and crunchy.

Like a soufflé but less temperamental, this pudding can be served either straight from the oven or at room temperature. Don’t worry if you can’t find fresh corn; frozen kernels work just fine.

Thanksgiving Make-Ahead Tip: This cranberry sauce cranberry sauce can be refrigerated for up to 2 weeks.


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