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Wild Mushroom Fettuccine

  • SERVINGS: 12

The Mondavis chose this pasta for their meal in Italy because it features wild mushrooms, a staple in their California kitchen. Porcini and chanterelles are especially good varieties to use because they stay firm when tossed with the pasta; don't include oyster mushrooms, which tend to get too flabby during cooking.

  1. 1 stick (4 ounces) unsalted butter
  2. 3/4 cup finely chopped shallots
  3. 4 garlic cloves, minced
  4. 2 pounds assorted fresh wild mushrooms, cleaned and thickly sliced if large
  5. Salt and freshly ground pepper
  6. 1 1/2 cups dry white wine
  7. 3 cups chicken stock or canned low-sodium broth
  8. 2 1/2 pounds good-quality fresh or dried fettuccine
  9. 1/4 cup finely chopped parsley
  10. 1 1/2 cups Parmesan cheese shavings (about 1 1/2 ounces)
  1. Divide the butter between 2 large skillets and melt until foaming. Add half of the shallots to each skillet and cook over moderately high heat, stirring, until slightly softened, about 2 minutes. Add half of the garlic to each skillet and cook, stirring, for 1 minute longer. Add half the mushrooms to each skillet, season with salt and pepper and raise the heat to high. Cook, stirring, until the mushrooms have exuded their liquid and are lightly browned, 7 to 10 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the mushrooms to a large bowl.
  2. Pour the wine into 1 of the skillets and boil over high heat, stirring, until reduced to about 2 tablespoons, about 10 minutes. Add the chicken stock and boil until reduced by half, about 20 minutes. Return the mushrooms to the skillet, season with salt and pepper and keep warm.
  3. Meanwhile, bring a very large pot of water to a boil. Add salt, then add the fettuccine and cook until al dente. Drain the pasta and toss with the mushrooms and sauce. Sprinkle the parsley and garnish with the shaved Parmesan.

Suggested Pairing

The exotic spice and tropical fruit flavors, along with the crisp acidity, of a California Sauvignon Blanc like Robert Mondavi's Fumé Blanc Reserve make for an excellent match with lighter pastas. The full body stands up to the mushrooms without being overbearing.