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Torta Di Napoli

  • ACTIVE: 45 MIN
  • TOTAL TIME: 2 HRS
  • SERVINGS: 10 to 12
  • MAKE-AHEAD

Seen Lippert's take on this savory Italian pie has three kinds of cured meat and three types of cheese stuffed into an extremely flaky crust. Because the torta is served at room temperature, it's great for picnics.

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  1. 4 ounces prosciutto, sliced 1/2 inch thick and cut into 1/2-inch dice
  2. 4 ounces Genoa salami, sliced 1/2 inch thick and cut into 1/2-inch dice
  3. 4 ounces mortadella, sliced 1/2 inch thick and cut into 1/2-inch dice
  4. 2 ounces provolone, shredded
  5. 1 cup fresh ricotta cheese
  6. 1/3 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  7. 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  8. 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  9. Flaky Double-Crust Pastry
  10. 1 large egg yolk mixed with 1 tablespoon milk
  1. Preheat the oven to 375° and position a shelf in the lower third. In a food processor, pulse the prosciutto, salami and mortadella just until finely chopped. Transfer the mixture to a large bowl and stir in the shredded provolone, ricotta, Parmesan, lightly beaten egg and pepper.
  2. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out a disk of the Flaky Double-Crust Pastry to a 13-inch round. Loosely wrap the pastry around a rolling pin and transfer it into a 9-inch glass pie plate; press it gently into the pie plate. Roll out the remaining pastry disk to a 13-inch round.
  3. Spread the filling in the pastry shell in an even layer. Brush the pastry rim with water and cover with the second pastry round. Press the edges to seal, then trim the overhang to 1/2 inch, fold it under and crimp decoratively. Brush the top crust with the egg wash and bake for 45 minutes, until the crust is golden on the top and bottom. Transfer the torta to a wire rack to cool. Cut into wedges and serve.
Make Ahead The baked torta can be refrigerated for up to 2 days. Bring to room temperature before cutting into wedges.

Suggested Pairing

For this Neapolitan tart, try an Aglianico, such as one from the Campania region of Italy. It has enough red-berry juiciness and tannins to balance the full-flavored salami and mortadella.