F&W Free Preview All You Coastal Living Cooking Light Food and Wine tab Health myRecipes Southern Living Sunset
My F&W
quick save (...)
Standing Rib Roast of Beef
© James Ransom

Standing Rib Roast of Beef

  • SERVINGS: 12

This roasting method is an adaptation of the classic English approach, and who can argue with the Brits when it comes to roasting a joint of beef? This roast is cooked to medium rare; it comes out of the oven at 120° and reaches 130° to 135° as it rests before carving. If you like your meat cooked to medium, roast it to 130°.

  1. 1/3 cup Dijon mustard
  2. 2 tablespoons minced garlic
  3. 1 tablespoon chopped thyme leaves
  4. 2 teaspoons coarsely ground pepper
  5. Kosher salt
  6. 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  7. One 5-rib 12- to 13-pound prime rib roast, chine bone removed
  1. Preheat the oven to 450°. In a small bowl, mix the mustard with the garlic, thyme, pepper and 2 teaspoons of kosher salt. Whisk in the olive oil.
  2. Set the meat, bone side down, in a roasting pan and season it lightly with salt. Roast the meat in the lower third of the oven for 20 minutes.
  3. Remove the meat from the oven and reduce the temperature to 350°. Brush the mustard coating all over the top and sides of the meat and roast for about 1 1/2 hours longer, rotating the roasting pan 2 or 3 times for even browning. The meat is done when an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center of the roast at the thickest part registers 120° (for medium rare). Transfer the roast to a carving board, cover it loosely with foil and let rest for 20 to 30 minutes.
  4. Set the roast on its side and run a long, sharp knife between the bones and meat; remove the bones and set them aside. Turn the roast right side up. Carve the roast 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick and transfer the slices to warmed plates. Pour any carving juices over the meat and serve at once. For bone-gnawing carnivores, cut down between the rib bones and pass them on a plate.

Suggested Pairing

A rich, deep Burgundy with strong meaty flavors and good fruit acidity is a classic accompaniment to roast beef.

You Might Also Like

Ratings

Average Rating

(1)

Comments

Add A Comment

    Add a Comment

    See our terms
    You must be logged in to comment. or
    advertisement
    The Dish
    Receive delicious recipes and smart wine advice 4x per week in this e-newsletter.
    The Wine List Weekly pairing plus best bottles to buy.
    F&W Daily One sensational dish served fresh every day.
    American Express Publishing ("AEP") may use your email address to send you account updates and offers that may interest you. To learn more about the ways we may use your email address and about your privacy choices, read the AEP Privacy Statement.
    How we use your email address
    advertisement
    Congratulations to Nicholas Elmi, winner of Top Chef: New Orleans, the 11th season of Bravo's Emmy-Award winning, hit reality series.

    Join celebrity chefs, renowned winemakers and epicurean insiders at the culinary world’s most spectacular weekend, the FOOD & WINE Classic in Aspen, June 20-22.