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Squid and Black-Eyed Pea Salad
© David Tsay

Squid and Black-Eyed Pea Salad

  • ACTIVE: 20 MIN
  • TOTAL TIME: 1 HR Plus overnight soaking
  • SERVINGS: 10
  • FAST
  • HEALTHY
  • MAKE-AHEAD

"Whenever you go to Spain, you always have beans," says Gerald Hirigoyen. "And squid is everywhere in Basque country, where I grew up, and in California too." Hirigoyen combines earthy black-eyed peas (which are a kind of bean) and quickly boiled squid with red wine vinegar and fresh herbs to create a bright-flavored, satisfying first-course salad.

Cost: $16.75

  1. 1 1/2 cups dried black-eyed peas, soaked overnight and drained
  2. Salt
  3. 1 1/2 pounds cleaned squid—bodies cut into 1/2-inch rings, tentacles halved
  4. 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  5. 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  6. Freshly ground pepper
  7. 2 celery ribs, finely diced
  8. 1/4 cup minced shallots
  9. 1 large tomato, finely diced
  10. 1/4 cup finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
  11. 2 tablespoons finely chopped tarragon
  1. In a large saucepan, cover the black-eyed peas with 2 inches of water and bring to a boil. Simmer over moderate heat until the peas are nearly tender, about 30 minutes. Season generously with salt and cook until tender, about 10 minutes longer. Drain the peas and let cool.
  2. Bring a large saucepan of salted water to a boil and fill a large bowl with ice water. Add the squid to the boiling water and cook just until firm, about 30 seconds. Drain and immediately transfer the squid to the ice water to cool. Drain again and pat dry with a clean towel.
  3. In a large bowl, whisk the olive oil with the vinegar and season with salt and pepper. Add the squid, black-eyed peas, celery, shallots, tomato, parsley and tarragon. Toss well and serve.
Make Ahead The dressed salad can be covered and refrigerated overnight. Toss the salad again just before serving to redistribute the dressing. Notes The cost of the recipe is based on the amount of each ingredient used.

Suggested Pairing

The varied flavors in Gerald Hirigoyen's salad—earthy, sweet, briny—beg for an all-purpose wine like a rosé. He poured a bottling from Spain's Navarra region.