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Lamb Loins with Mustard Crumbs
© Quentin Bacon

Lamb Loins with Mustard Crumbs

  • SERVINGS: 4
  • FAST

George Gebhardt, a greenhouse owner, likes to use the lamb loin, which includes the tenderloin and is often called the saddle. The more expensive rib roast is also wonderful with the mustard crumbs.

  1. 3 tablespoons unsalted butter plus 5 tablespoons, melted
  2. 2 whole boneless lamb loins (about 1 pound each)
  3. Salt and freshly ground pepper
  4. About 1/4 cup all-purpose flour, for dredging
  5. 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  6. 1 cup coarse dry bread crumbs
  7. 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped flat-leaf parsley
  8. 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  9. 1 teaspoon minced shallot
  10. 2 teaspoons finely chopped oregano
  11. 2 teaspoons finely chopped basil
  12. 2 teaspoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  1. Preheat the oven to 450°. Melt the 3 tablespoons of butter in a large ovenproof skillet. Season the lamb loins with salt and pepper and dredge in the flour. Add to the skillet and cook over moderately high heat, turning, until browned all over, about 6 minutes. Let the lamb cool slightly, then pat dry and brush with the mustard.
  2. On a plate, mix the bread crumbs with the parsley, garlic, shallot, oregano, basil, Parmesan and the melted butter. Roll the lamb in the crumb mixture, pressing it into the meat.
  3. Return the lamb to the skillet and roast for about 15 minutes for medium-rare meat. Transfer to a work surface, cover loosely with foil and let stand for 5 minutes. Slice the lamb loins 1/3 inch thick and serve.
Serve With Grilled asparagus.

Suggested Pairing

There's no reason to stray here from the traditional pairing, red Bordeaux. The crust adds a tangy note to the richness of the lamb, so young, vigorous bottlings, with their cleansing tannins, will make the best match.