Active Time
40 MIN
Total Time
1 HR 30 MIN
Yield
Serves : 4

This classic pork dish is often referred to as a farmer's recipe because it is prepared with only the most basic ingredients. Unlike many braised meats, which get their richness from being cooked for hours, this pork tenderloin needs to simmer for only 20 minutes in a wine sauce spiked with pimentón. Made from dried red peppers that have been smoked over oak, then ground, pimentón is produced in La Vera, in the Cáceres region of Spain. Plus: More Pork Recipes and Tips

How to Make It

Step 1    

Season the pork with salt and pepper. In a large, shallow baking dish, mix 1 tablespoon of the olive oil with the parsley and pimentón. Add the tenderloins and turn to coat. Let stand at room temperature for 20 minutes or refrigerate for at least 1 hour or for up to 2 hours.

Step 2    

In a large, deep skillet, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Add the pork and cook over moderate heat until browned, about 3 minutes per side. Transfer the pork to a plate.

Step 3    

Add the bay leaves, green bell pepper and onion to the skillet and cook over moderate heat until softened, 4 minutes. Add the flour and stir until a smooth paste forms. Gradually whisk in the wine; bring to a simmer, whisking for 2 minutes. Whisk in the stock and tomato paste and return to a simmer.

Step 4    

Return the pork tenderloin and any accumulated juices to the skillet and simmer over low heat for 10 minutes. Turn and simmer for about 10 minutes longer, or just until the pork is pink in the center. Transfer the pork to a cutting board and let stand for 5 minutes.

Step 5    

Meanwhile, remove the bay leaves from the pan sauce and pour into a food processor or blender and puree. Return the sauce to the skillet, add the piquillo peppers and bring to a simmer over moderately low heat. Season with salt and pepper. Thickly slice the pork and serve with the pan sauce.

Make Ahead

The recipe can be prepared earlier in the day. Reheat gently.

Notes

Pimentón is available at specialty markets in sweet and hot varieties. The best-quality jarred piquillo peppers are available at most specialty markets. For firmer peppers, look for brands that are packed in only salt and water with no citric acid added to the brine.

Suggested Pairing

A spicy Spanish red will stand up to the rich, smoky wine sauce here.

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