Chicken and Okra Fricassee
© John Kernick

Chicken and Okra Fricassee

  • ACTIVE: 40 MIN
  • TOTAL TIME: 1 HR 30 MIN
  • SERVINGS: 4

"If you don't stew it, you can't eat it," says Eric Ripert about cooking Brazil's tough but flavorful chickens. Here, he lightens a traditional chicken stew with lemongrass and ginger.

slideshow  More Chicken Recipes

Ingredients

  1. One 4-pound chicken, cut into 8 pieces
  2. Salt and freshly ground pepper
  3. 1 tablespoon minced oregano
  4. 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  5. 2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
  6. 1 small onion, finely chopped
  7. 1 garlic clove, minced
  8. 1 teaspoon all-purpose flour
  9. 1 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
  10. 1 cup unsweetened coconut milk
  11. 2 large stalks of lemongrass, lower half cut into 3-inch lengths and lightly smashed
  12. 3/4 pound baby okra
  1. Put the chicken in a large shallow dish and season with salt, pepper and the oregano. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour.
  2. Heat the oil in a large enameled cast-iron casserole. Add half of the chicken pieces and cook over moderately high heat until browned, about 4 minutes per side. Transfer the chicken to a large plate; repeat with the remaining chicken.
  3. Add the ginger, onion and garlic to the casserole and cook over low heat, stirring, until softened, about 4 minutes. Stir in the flour until blended, then stir in the chicken broth, coconut milk and lemongrass and bring to a boil. Add the chicken and its juices and simmer over low heat, turning the pieces once, until the breasts are cooked through, about 20 minutes. Transfer the breasts to a plate. Cook the dark meat for about 10 minutes longer.
  4. Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan of boiling salted water, cook the okra until bright green, about 2 minutes. Drain well. Return the chicken breasts to the stew and stir in the okra. Season with salt and pepper and simmer for 3 minutes.
Serve With
Rice and lime wedges.

Suggested Pairing

This rustic stew needs a red with bright fruit and medium body—in other words, Pinot Noir. And as more and more Pinot is planted in Chile, the wines are getting better and better.

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