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Artichokes with Anchoïade
© Quentin Bacon

Artichokes with Anchoïade

  • SERVINGS: 12
  • FAST
  • MAKE-AHEAD

Anchoïade, the garlicky Provençal dip made with anchovies, green olives and extra-virgin olive oil, is usually served with a mixed platter of raw and cooked vegetables, including artichokes.<

Plus: More Vegetable Recipes and Tips

  1. 1 large lemon, halved, plus 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  2. 6 large artichokes
  3. 6 cups water
  4. 4 thyme sprigs
  5. 7 garlic cloves—4 halved, 3 coarsely chopped
  6. 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  7. 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  8. Two 3-ounce jars oil-packed anchovies, drained and chopped
  9. 2/3 cup green olives, such as Picholine, pitted and chopped
  10. 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar
  11. 1/4 cup grapeseed oil
  12. 1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
  13. Freshly ground pepper
  1. Squeeze the lemon halves into a large bowl of water. Working with 1 artichoke at a time, snap off the outer leaves. Using a sharp knife, cut off the top third of the artichoke. Peel the stem, leaving it long. Cut the artichoke in half lengthwise. Using a spoon, scrape out the furry choke. Cut each half lengthwise into thirds and add to the lemon water.
  2. In a large saucepan, combine the 6 cups of water with the thyme, halved garlic, 2 tablespoons of the olive oil and the salt and bring to a boil. Add the artichokes, cover and simmer over low heat until tender, about 12 minutes. Drain and transfer to a large platter to cool.
  3. In a blender, puree the chopped garlic with the anchovies, olives, vinegar and lemon juice. With the machine on, slowly pour in the remaining 1/2 cup olive oil and the grapeseed oil to make a smooth sauce. Scrape the dip into a bowl, stir in the lemon zest and season with pepper. Serve the artichokes with the anchoïade at room temperature.
Make Ahead The artichokes and anchoïade can be refrigerated overnight.

Suggested Pairing

The pronounced acidity in a good Blanc de Blancs Champagne stands up to the acidity in the artichokes, which makes most wines taste metallic and sweet. Look for an elegant Brut.