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Pivovara 8’s Kraken’s Treasure Adriatic Sea Edition spent almost half a year underwater.

Mike Pomranz
April 09, 2018

Though far from a widely used technique, plenty of wineries have been experimenting with aging wine underwater. Proponents argue that this process causes the contents to mature more quickly, leading to a smoother, more enjoyable wine. With that in mind, a Croatian underwater winery recently teamed up with a nearby brewery to release a beer that was aged with the same technique.

With the help of Coral Wine, a winery that specializes in sea-aged wines, the Pivovara 8 brewery was able to create its recently debuted Kraken’s Treasure Adriatic Sea Edition, a small collection of 750-milliliter bottles of a 7.8 ABV porter that was aged for 180 days 20-feet underwater near the island of Pag in the Adriatic Sea, according to The Drinks Business. The first trial beers were introduced during a tasting last Wednesday.

Zadar wine festival😎

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“We submerged 30 test bottles, and by the end of the year we are planning to submerge around 500 bottles, mostly magnums,” Marko Dušević, founder of Coral Wine, told the site Gastro.hr. “Our impression is that [beer] changes a lot in the sea, and for the better. This is just part of the project because we have 100 different types of wine from 30 wineries in the sea.”

Beyond purportedly making the beer taste better, the process also leaves bottles covered with sea “scars,” almost like bottle barnacles, that gives each one its own unique appearance. Gastro.hr suggests that this turns the bottles into individual pieces of art perfect for a special occasion.

These porters weren’t the first time a beer has been aged underwater. A South African brewery unleashed an ocean-aged beer last year. And back in 2016, Florida’s Marker 48 Brewing put one of its double IPAs into a whiskey barrel which it then aged 48 feet underwater in a local spring. And forget about aging, back in 2011, Scotland’s BrewDog brewed a beer under the sea. Beer is mostly water: Maybe spending time there just makes the beer feel at home again?