Courtesy of Netflix

The six-part series from the Anthony Bourdain-affiliated Zero Point Zero Productions takes an unappetizing look at the world of food.

Mike Pomranz
December 18, 2017

New York City-based production company Zero Point Zero has been behind a number of popular food-oriented television shows including both Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservations and Parts Unknown as well as The Mind of a Chef—series that have celebrated culinary experiences. But for its latest project, Rotten, as the name implies, the production house has taken a much different approach, diving instead into the food world’s seedy underbelly. “The truth is hard to swallow,” the tagline states.

Set to debut on Netflix on January 5, Rotten is described as giving food “the true crime treatment, diving deep into the food production underworld to expose the corruption, waste and real dangers behind your everyday eating habits. In a world where huge global supply-chains are increasingly intertwined and consolidated, this series starts on your dinner plate… and follows the money to the shocking consequences—intended or not—of regulation, innovation and greed.”

If it sounds pretty unappetizing, that’s kind of the point. “If you eat food, this is an issue you need to worry about,” an unnamed voice ominously explains in a recently released trailer for the six-part series. Similar to another Zero Point Zero production from earlier this year—Wasted! The Story of Food Waste—Rotten is about far more than entertainment: The hope is that the series will raise awareness of many of the problems currently afflicting the global food chain. Each episode, all of which are being released at the same time, focuses on a different topic: “Lawyers, Guns and Honey,” “The Peanut Problem,” “Garlic Breath,” “Big Bird,” “Milk Money,” and “Cod Is Dead.”

Unfortunately, thanks to its January release date, Rotten won’t be available for binge-watching until after everyone’s holiday break. Though seeing as how much eating we tend to do around the holidays, maybe that’s for the best? Instead, take the above trailer as a bit of an appetizer.