Courtesy of Ryan Forbes

The working bar is made from 1,300 pounds of gingerbread. 

Elisabeth Sherman
November 28, 2017

Gingerbread houses: You made them as a child, smushing square pieces of gingerbread together using icing as glue, and gum drops as decoration for the roof and around the door frame. It was that day of the year in the elementary school when suddenly your teachers and parents were encouraging you to eat candy. They actually handed you Red Hots, and Twizzlers, and peppermints to give your house a cute design, which you then got to take home, and hopefully, eat for dessert. Those days carefree gingerbread house crafting and candy eating are probably behind most of you now, so what’s the adult version? Probably the life-size gingerbread bar at the JW Marriott in Los Angeles. Yes, you read that right. It’s an actual working bar, made out of gingerbread.

The gingerbread bar, nicknamed Santa’s Tavern, officially opened yesterday. It was constructed from 1,300 pounds of spiced cookie dough and sugar and is decorated with barstools and bottles made entirely from candy and cookie dough. While open, the bar will offer cocktail tastings, mixology classes, and of course, drinks and snacks to enjoy when you stop by the hotel.

On December 6 and December 13, Santa’s Tavern will host the hotel’s Liquid Intelligence series, which features tastings and cocktail-making demonstrations, focusing on the hot toddy the first night, and sparkling cocktails on the second night.

The bar will also feature three signature cocktails, Santa’s Little Helper, a new twist on the classic mule served in a copper elf; More the Merrier, a mix of pomegranate, ginger beer, lemon, and Absolut Elyx; and the Mistletoe Mimosa, made with cranberry and Taittinger Prestige Rosé. Santa’s Tavern will be on display until the end of the year.

On December 16, the hotel will host Holly Jolly Day, a pre-Christmas extravaganza that includes an ice rink and a hot chocolate fountain. And yes, Santa Claus—who is very, very real—will be stopping by to visit the festivities all the way from the North Pole.