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These prices may still shock you. 

Elisabeth Sherman
April 19, 2017

The epic saga of the 19-year-old packet of McDonald’s ‘Mulan’ Szechuan sauce all started when a man decided to clean out his car. He found the discarded sauce at the perfect time: The season three premiere of the show Rick & Morty had recently caused a stir when the title characters demanded the sauce’s return to the fast food chain. 

Sensing an opportunity, the man posted the item on eBay, where he wrote that “he would prefer not to sell it to a collector." The item received 187 bids before it sold for $14,700—a fortune in the food auction world, where rare and nostalgia-inducing products are often sold with a high price tag. Maybe now he can afford to ditch that old car.

Here are eight more food items with a cult-like following that have sold for big bucks online:

 

Royal Wedding Cake - $7,500

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A slice of cake from the wedding of Duke and Duchess of Cambridge – better known as Will and Kate – sold for $7,500 in 2014, to Gee Chuang, chief executive of the Silicon Valley startup Listia. Yes, it was still a coveted piece of memorabilia three whole years after the fact. To be fair, it is fruitcake, which is notorious for being edible months or even years after it has been made. 

Justin Timberlake’s Breakfast - $1,025

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Two slices of half-eaten French toast made it into the hands of 19-year-old ‘N Sync super fan Kathy Summers in 2000. Timberlake—now an Oscar nominated song writer—left the toast behind after a radio interview. The DJ, in a slightly creepy move, snatched up the unfinished food and posted it on eBay, where Summer came out victorious in an apparently heated bidding war. Her plans for it? At the time she said she would “freeze-dry it, then seal it…then put it on my dresser.”

Screaming Eagle Wines - $3,000

© www.KLWines.com

The eponymous vineyard and winery produces limited quantities of their Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, elevating their work to highly sought after cult status: As few as 500 cases of their wines are available every year, and there’s a mandatory waiting list to purchase the wine through their website. If you’re into more nefarious means of obtaining a bottle, one is currently available on eBay for around $3,000 dollars. 

Vintage Steak - $3,200

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This 2000 vintage rib steak costs $3,200 dollars. Why? The trick is a very fast, very cold wind: Butcher Alexandre Polmard blows air over the steak at 75 miles per hour at -45 degrees Fahrenheit. The steak is then aged for 15 years. Polmard says that before the cows become dinner they are treated to “five-star accommodation.” Not that it’s likely that you’ll get a chance to ever try one: Polmard sells his cuts to very few restaurants, and the waiting list to buy a steak of your own is months long. 

A Rare Bourbon - $3,300

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The legendary and coveted bourbon is made at the Old Rip Van Winkle Brewery and is touted by many as amongst the rarest and most difficult to get. A bottle of Pappy Van Winkle has a recommended manufacturer’s price of $269, but because it’s high quality and limited production some retailers sell it for nearly $3,300. Of course, we guess you could just try to steal it.

And a Bedazzled Scotch - $14,000

© Macallan

There were just 420 bottles of this 55-year-old Macallan's single-malt scotch released in 2006. It comes in a gorgeous crystal encrusted bottle, and it’ll cost you $14,000 to try. You can however, buy a bottle of the 30-year-aged version online right now for around $6,000. 

The Good Part of Oreo - $3,000

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Though we’re not sure what you’d use it for, there is currently a 50-lb bag of Oreo filling available for purchase on eBay. If you’re imagining using it in your own baked goods to create Oreo-inspired desserts of your own, you should know that the seller “literally scraped [it] off of real Oreos.” Doesn’t sound entirely hygienic. Not only that but it’s incredibly expensive: the filling is currently going for $3,000. If you’re that desperate for some excess filling, couldn’t you just scrape it off yourself?

A Bunch of Grapes - $14,000

© STR / Stringer / Getty Images

In Japan, fruit—especially melons, which can cost a bidder as much $1 million—is as much of a status symbol as vintage wines are in the West. Last summer, grocer Takamaru Konish landed a bunch of 30 Ruby Roman grapes for $14,000. The grapes are big (as far as grapes go), each one if the size of a ping pong ball, and this particular strain of the fruit was carefully grown over 15 years. Konish won’t be stingy with his prize, thankfully. After his win he told the press, ““We will display them at our store before giving our customers a sample taste.”