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He joins new judge Prue Leith in concerns over the calorie count of the competition's challenges.

August 07, 2017

Although he admits to having a “very sweet tooth,” the new host of the Great British Bake Off, Noel Fielding, says that he doesn’t plan on indulging in any of the confections created by the show’s contestants.

In an interview with the Sunday Times, Fielding, who will be joined by fellow comedian Sandi Toksvig in his hosting duties, claimed that he fears gaining weight will be make his less desirable to casting directors.

“I get more work when I'm thinner," Fielding said. “I was playing Alice Cooper and I had to lose a stone, so I wasn’t eating sugar. You can’t just get straight back onto sugar, as it’s quite a powerful thing."

Yes, sugar does have the power told hold sway over your taste buds, but Fielding may have an ally in his quest to stay fit: One of the show’s new judges, Prue Leith, hopes to urge contestants to bake treats with less sugar and butter, and explore healthy dessert options in their challenges. If she gets her way, Fielding may actually have an opportunity to taste test some of the show’s bake goods.

But if Fielding sticks to his proclamation that he won’t be trying out any of treats, that will certainly be another departure from the show’s original format: Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc, who hosted the Great British Bake Off when it was still on the BBC, seemed to take great joy in the tasting every sweet thing the contestants cooked up.

On top of that, Jay Hunt, CEO at the show’s new home, Channel Four, explained that the show would take on a “modern and future facing,” tone, perhaps straying away from the heartwarmingly goofy comedic tone of past seasons.

The official premiere date of the new season hasn’t yet been announced (although the trailer was recently released), but if there’s one thing to look forward to from a show that seems to be getting mixed reactions already, it might just be Fielding’s strange sense of humor.

“I don’t eat anything,” he explained to the Sunday Times. “I’m like a plant.”