Beth Galton Photography; Charlotte Omnes / Food Stylist

"Cut Food" is a photography project that defies physics.

Clara Olshansky
June 12, 2017

When you hear the word "beauty", you probably don't immediately think of corn flakes and milk or your gas station-sourced cup of Styrofoam coffee, but in the "Cut Food" photo series, even the most mundane foods become totally fascinating. The photos, which depict a variety of foods sliced down the middle to reveal their insides, were created by food and still life photographer Beth Galton and food stylist Charlotte Omnès.

Beth Galton Photography; Charlotte Omnes / Food Stylist

Okay, so some of the photos aren't actually taken by simply cutting the food in half. For example, if you cut hot soup down the middle, you're going to end up with scalded hands and no photograph. According to Business Insider, the noodle soup and minestrone soup photos were created by adding gelatin to keep the soups in place. The stuffed turkey, on the other hand, is actually just a cut-in-half stuffed turkey, but they had to use a band saw to get the perfect cross section.

Beth Galton Photography; Charlotte Omnes / Food Stylist

Some of the foods, like the pickled eggs or the donuts, look like they could hold their position forever. Others, like the cornflakes mid-milk-splash or the sundae with an explosion of sprinkles, had to be incredibly well timed. Galton and Omnès also had the assistance of two digital retouchers to help them create the shots that aren't strictly possible with just the laws of physics.

Beth Galton Photography; Charlotte Omnes / Food Stylist

You can get a peek into the process of making "Cut Food" here. The video includes an incredibly satisfying shot of butter being splashed onto popcorn and of caramel being drizzled onto half a sundae. For more gorgeous food photos, you can follow Galton and Omnes on Instagram.