Brisket Is Healthy, Says Texas A&M Scientist

© Hector Sanchez

By Morgan Goldberg Posted September 12, 2016

Meat to the face.

Did you know there is such thing as good cholesterol? Did you also know that eating brisket helps increase levels of good cholesterol? In just about the most exciting research finding of all time, Texas A&M AgriLife research scientist Dr. Stephen Smith discovered that the high levels of oleic acid in brisket help to increase levels of HDL, known as the good kind of cholesterol.

According to Smith, brisket is the ideal trim for ground beef. “Brisket has higher oleic acid than the flank or plate, which are the trims typically used to produce ground beef,” he said, “[and] Americans consume over 50 percent of their beef as ground beef.”

While we will certainly take this to heart when buying ground beef, we’re most excited to guiltlessly cut into a juicy piece of brisket.

Here, six ways to celebrate the deliciousness of science:

Barbecued Brisket and Burnt Ends

Food & Wine:

This juicy, flavorful brisket spends ten hours on the grill and it is so worth it.

Gail Simmons’s Horseradish Brisket

Food & Wine:

You’ll love the horseradish kick of Gail Simmons’s braised brisket.

Andrew Zimmern’s Hanukkah Brisket

Food & Wine:

It doesn’t have to be Hanukkah for you to enjoy chef Andrew Zimmern’s juicy brisket, which is best roasted whole.

Beef Brisket with Lemon-Oregano Sauce

Food & Wine:

By both braising and roasting this brisket, you’ll get tender meat with a crispy crust.

Red-Wine-Braised Beef Brisket

Food & Wine:

This German braised brisket is both very sweet and very sour.

Rob Walsh’s Texas Barbecue Brisket

Food & Wine:

Everything’s bigger in Texas, including flavor.

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