Recipes for the Living, the Dead, and the Undead—and For a Good Cause

© Caroline Church

By Taylor Rondestvedt Posted November 01, 2016

The Monster’s Cookbook has the recipes of your nightmares—and it also serves a good cause.

“Many of our customers have been coming to us for centuries,” states Hoxton Street Monster Supplies, on its website. “Some for considerably longer.”

Just in time for Halloween and the Day of the Dead (which is today), the store, London’s premier purveyor of all things spooky—and, apparently, a favorite shopping destination for the living, the dead, and the undead—is out with a deliciously fright-filled cookbook. Should you be tempted to experiment in the kitchen with such delightful ingredients as bone dust, entrails, or human snot, The Monster’s Cookbook contains something for everyone (and everything), whether you’re “Vampire, Werewolf, Sasquatch or something else entirely.”

Inside you’ll find helpful etiquette tips on how to invite various creatures of the night to dinner, what to do should a swamp creature track slime on your brand new carpet, and how to carve up a human. A book that’s as fun to read as it is to cook from, there’s a perfect mix of sweet tidbits, savory tipples and even delicious salted toenails for monsters young and old.

The best part of the cookbook? Due to an "ancient curse," all of the profits of Hoxton Street Monster Supplies go to the Ministry of Stories, a creative writing and mentoring program for young authors. The shop owners claim they “are doing everything in [their] power to rectify this intolerable situation,” (perhaps with a batch or two of 1000-Year Curse Reverse Cookies) but in the meantime, we’ll be enjoying slices of our Thickest Human Snot Curd Tart with the happy knowledge that our money is going to a good cause.

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