Washington State Is Home to the ‘First Public Legal Ayahuasca Church in America’

By Mike Pomranz |

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Back in 2012, the state of Washington legalized marijuana. Now, the Pacific Northwest state has become home to what is being called “the first public, legal ayahuasca church in America” – giving people looking to join the spiritual group the right to legally trip on hallucinogenic tea.

In an interview with Munchies, Trinity de Guzman, a founder of Ayahuasca Healings, discussed how this new church located near Elbe, Washington, became legal. “We were working with the New Haven Native American Church, which is a branch of the Oklevueha Native American Church and has the authority and the ability to use sacraments like ayahuasca by virtue of the American Indian Religious Freedom Act, designed to protect and preserve the tradition and cultural practices of American Indians,” he explained. “As a result, pertaining to us, the government cannot interfere with our Native American ceremonies, sacraments, or our plant teachers like peyote and ayahuasca.”

Though de Guzman says they’re not America’s first ayahuasca church, they are the only “public” one, using the internet to “share this message.”

So what’s the message? Well, ayahuasca is often described as a “sacred” drink that contains DMT – a naturally occurring hallucinogen that is also one of the most potent. It’s been revered for its supposed spiritual properties for generations. Rick Strassman even wrote a book on the drug called The Spirit Molecule. But being that it’s a powerful hallucinogen, it’s also a Schedule 1 drug, meaning getting chemically spiritual legally in the US wasn’t always easy.

Now, thanks to Ayahuasca Healings, anyone can sign up. Assuming you can navigate through the church’s website. Who made that thing? Some dude on DMT?? Oh… right…

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