The Oxford English Dictionary Just Got a Bit More Drinking Credibility

By Mike Pomranz |
FWX BEER DRINKING_0

Historical image collection by Bildagentur-online

Today marks that wonderful quarterly time of year when the Oxford University Press announces the latest additions to its online dictionary. And in the best dictionary-related news of the year, “beer o’clock” has made the cut.

That means anyone applying to beer school can begin their admission essay this way: The Oxford English Dictionary defines beer o’clock as “an appropriate time of day for starting to drink beer.” Since lots of beer schools don't require essays, that may be all you need.

Despite it being a bit of a strange selection, their definition is remarkably spot-on. And, not to be outdone, “wine o’clock” was also deemed worthy of dictionary inclusion. It’s a phrase I’ve never used, but I’m guessing it might be big on Pinterest.

Why stop there, Oxford? Where’s “whiskey o’clock” or “cider o’clock” or “dear-lord-I’ve-drank-too-much-I-need-some-water o’clock”? Apparently these phrases haven’t become common enough to land a spot. Instead, “butthurt” and “manspreading” took their potential places on the list. (Remind me not to let my kids read the dictionary.)

Or here’s another idea, Oxford University Press... Why not just get this whole thing over with and merge with Urban Dictionary? They’ve had a definition for “beer o’clock” since 2003.

Related: These Are the New Food Words Added to the Dictionary 
20 Wine Words Most Drinkers Don't Know 
Why Do So Many People Hate the Word Moist

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