© Jason Adlen/Bloomberg/Getty Images
Clara Olshansky
June 22, 2017

At this point you know everything there is to know about a Kit Kat, right? It's a chocolate-covered wafer (or possibly just chocolate). But did you ever wonder what's inside the wafer? As it turns out, every break of a Kit Kat bar is its own little Kit Kat-ception. The wafers are filled with other Kit Kats.

You see, Kit Kat manufacturers leave no Kit Kat uneaten. So, if quality assurance deems a certain Kit Kat not up to the Kit Kat standard of excellence, if it's misaligned, somehow flawed, or just not shiny enough, it will get lumped in with all the other imperfect Kit Kats.

The Kit Kat rejects all get mashed up together into a paste, which is then used to fill the wafers of other Kit Kats. So, if you think about it, the imperfect Kit Kats were already filled with other imperfect Kit Kats, and some of the Kit Kats they'll fill will also be rejected. Basically, every time you eat a Kit Kat you're eating tons of layers of Kit Kats within Kit Kats within Kit Kats.

Bonus points for sake Kit Kats within sake Kit Kats or gold Kit Kats within gold Kit Kats.

[h/t mental_floss]

Related: The Not-So-American History of Cheez Whiz 
A Dentist Actually Invented Cotton Candy 
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