Ah, garlic. There’s no better ingredient for turning the bland into an aromatic, vibrant feast–though onions are a close second (and also something you should keep around). I’m a big, big fan of garlic in all of its forms (powder, salt, etc.), but there’s nothing like a couple of minced, fresh cloves for flavoring meats, veggies, sauces, and everything in between. A head of fresh garlic will keep in your pantry for a few months, but once the bulb is broken, the cloves will only last about 7-10 days.

© Getty Images
Mike Pomranz
June 22, 2017

Over two years have passed since we last checked in on Ohio State University’s Dr. Sheryl Barringer – garlic breath preventer extraordinaire – but you can rest assured that while you’ve been chowing down on everything bad for your love life, the esteemed professor and department chair at OSU’s Department of Food Science and Technology is still fighting the good fight for Tinder daters everywhere, figuring out the best ways for you to keep your breath first-date-makeout-worthy.

Back in 2014, Barringer’s team suggested raw apples, lemon juice and green tea as great natural ways to neutralize garlic breath. But in a new paper published last week entitled, “Deodorization of Garlic Breath by Foods, and the Role of Polyphenol Oxidase and Phenolic Compounds,” they reassessed the problem of garlic breath with the same fine-toothed comb you should probably be using on your fantasy football team now that week three is practically in the books.

This time around, the OSU researchers have crowned a new champion when it comes to putting an end to your horrible garlic breath – and it’s a name you’re probably familiar with: mint. With the utmost respect towards Barringer and her research team, who didn’t see that one coming?

Related: HERE ARE 2016'S LEAST HEALTHY MEALS AT CHAIN RESTAURANTS

According to Science Daily, though the now old standby of raw apple, as well as a newcomer, raw lettuce, “decreased the concentration of volatiles in breath by 50 percent or more compared to the control for the first 30 minutes,” in the end, “mint leaves had a higher deodorization level … for all volatile compounds measured.”

The paper’s authors now suggest, “Chewing mint leaves, and eating apple and lettuce (raw and cooked) will help reduce the garlic breath volatiles.” Great. Well, what the hell am I supposed to do with all this extra lemon juice and green tea I’ve been hoarding?

You May Like