How They Made Candy In The Victorian Era

By Clara Olshansky |

Want to feel classy as hell while eating candy? Then try one of these drop candies straight out of the Victorian era. Lofty Pursuits, a candy store in Tallahassee, Florida, has revived a drop candy roller straight out of the 1800s. This roller turns out gorgeous candy after gorgeous candy, so it's unfortunate that it hasn't been used for, Lofty Pursuits estimates, almost 70 years. But, thanks to the candy company's restoration efforts, these drop candies can be yours by the bag. Just be careful you don't eat so many that you can't fit into your corset.

The candies are nectar flavored, a flavor whose secret recipe was taken straight from Mullane's, the 1800s candy shop that originally owned these gorgeous brass rollers.

So what are drop candies anyway? You've had them before; lemon drops and cough drops both fit into the category. They're the kind of hard sugar candies that come from rollers like this one. They're not common anymore—they fell out of popularity around World War II, possibly because the rollers were used for scrap metal—but they used to be huge. They're called drop candies because, once the sheet of candies is rolled out of the machine, all you have left to do is pick up the sheets and drop them to set the candy free.

For more gorgeous videos of candies being made, check out the Lofty Pursuits YouTube channel


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