Here’s Why Spicy Foods Make Your Nose Run

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Experts have always provided a fairly sensible explanation for why spicy foods taste spicy: The plants the spices come from use their abrasive taste as a defense mechanism to keep troublesome animals, humans included, from eating them. Sadly for those plants, we’ve embraced these aggressive flavors, and now we eat them even more often. Though, ironically, this phenomenon has also helped the plants proliferate since we now grow more of these plants for consumption, bringing into question whether this defense mechanism has been effective in spite of itself. How the hell has this turned into a philosophical discussion about plants?

Related: SCIENTISTS WANT TO KNOW WHY THE SOUND OF CHEWING SUCKS

Regardless, as the YouTube channel Today I Found Out points out, spice-producing plants may be even more devious that we think, because not only do the spices affect our tongue, they can also infiltrate our mucus membranes and make our noses run as well. It’s almost as if plants know the inner workings of our bodies and know exactly how to attack us – like there was some sort of plant Luke Skywalker who years ago delivered a map of the human body to a group of plant rebels exposing once and for all our greatest weakness.

I guess plants are just smarter than we ever realized – or maybe just bigger Star Wars fans.

Related: WHAT DOES BITTER BEER DO TO SPICY FOOD?

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