Go See the World’s Ugliest Animal at the Blobfish Café

By Noah Kaufman |
FWX BLOBFISH CAFE

Courtesy of Blobfish Café

Generally the Internet shows preference for cute animals—the sorts of creatures we want to cradle like babies and over whose Instagram pictures we turn into sobbing, blubbering messes. The subject of the newest animal café is not one of those animals.

Back in 2013 the blobfish earned the title of World’s Ugliest Animal, beating out strong competition from other hideous creatures like the proboscis monkey and whatever the hell this is.

It took a couple years, but the fascination with the blobfish finally earned the deep-sea dweller its own café. Opening in the summer of 2016 in London’s East End, the Blobfish Café will bear some similarities to other animal-themed pop-ups. Like the fox café that opened earlier this year, the goal is to educate people on an animal they may know much about. However, unlike the fox café (and the cat café and the owl café and the pig picnic), diners won’t get to touch the blobfish. “The blobfish will live in a pressurized tank,” said organizers. “Any interruption to this way of life would lead to their demise.” While that might be disappointing to some, they can take solace in another change from earlier animal-centered dining experiences—better food. While other pop ups got by on cookies, coffee, and in the case of the fox café, after-dinner mints (seriously, they claimed mints as food), the Blobfish Café will serve both lunch and dinner and even put together several eight course seafood tastings with young London chefs.

The café may not open until next summer, but until then you can follow one of the three blobfish that will call the café home on Twitter. We don’t see any a proboscis monkeys with their own Twitter accounts. 

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