Rich People Now Want Wine Tasting Rooms in Their Homes, Not Just Wine Cellars

By Mike Pomranz |

© DIZ Muenchen GmbH, Sueddeutsche Zeitung Photo / Alamy

Do you enjoy hosting events in your personal wine cellar? How quaint. According to a recent Wall Street Journal piece, wine cellars are out and personal wine tasting rooms are in. People still have wine cellars, of course, but those are literally only for cellaring your wine. You wouldn’t expect people to hang out down their like a group of trolls under a bridge, would you?

“Cellars are cold. They’re 55 degrees,” Marshall Tilden III, sales director at Wine Enthusiast, told the WSJ. “It’s not that enjoyable.” You’re damn right it’s not. Having to change into a thicker Brooks Brothers sweater just to walk into your own basement?  Give me a break.

David Marino—some very rich dude, presumably—explained the phenomenon: “We didn’t want to have to listen to the refrigeration or freeze our butts off, but still wanted to be connected to the cellar and have that cellar-feel…. We wanted an integrated space, but to provide the comfort to play poker or have a five-course dinner.” I mean, with a space that integrated, why not have a seven-course dinner?

One word of caution: Wine tasting rooms can add value to your home, but only if the next buyer is a wine fan. Otherwise, they can actually be a problem when it’s time to sell. That’s fine: I think most of us are in agreement that whenever we buy new houses the correct course of action is to bulldoze whatever’s on the lot and start from scratch. 

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