An Entire City Has Banned K-Cups

By Mike Pomranz |

© Duncan Taylor / Stockimo / Alamy

Most people would probably agree that the single-serve K-cups are wasteful. Sure, a lot of things are wasteful, but a K-cup is literally just a little cup that you use to brew coffee into a larger cup.

Well, one city has decided to do something about all those disposable K-cups. Hamburg, Germany has banned use of the coffee pods in all of its state-run buildings as part of a new policy against spending government funds on “certain polluting products or product components.” The “Kaffeekapselmaschine”(single serving machine) gets called out specifically in the new rules – and not just because it seems really fun to say. “These portion packs cause unnecessary resource consumption and waste generation, and often contain polluting aluminium,” the BBC quotes the German report as saying.

Apparently, one in every eight cups of coffee sold in Germany comes from a disposable pod. That’s lot of pods that are difficult to recycle, not just because of the materials they are made of—a mix typically consisting of plastic and aluminum—but also because after use they are stuffed with leftover coffee grounds. “It's 6g of coffee in 3g of packaging,” said Jan Dube, a spokesman of the Hamburg Department of the Environment and Energy. “We in Hamburg thought that these shouldn't be bought with taxpayers' money.”

Seriously. The taxpayers should be sending the government officials to Starbucks. Fraps, baby!

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