Eagles QB Carson Wentz Drops $500 Tip at Bar in His Old College Town

By Mike Pomranz |
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Rich Schultz

Getting drafted into the NFL and finally making that big athlete money must feel good. You can buy yourself a house. Or better yet, buy your parents a house since they got you to all those practices on time. Or maybe you just want to go to a bar in your old college town, run up a $1,000 tab, and leave a $500 tip just because you can.

The NFL’s overall number two pick in the 2016 draft and current Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Carson Wentz decided to do just that. On draft day, plenty of pundits debated whether the alumnus of North Dakota State, a school from what is essentially college football’s second tier, was ready to jump from the small streets of Fargo to the bright lights of the NFL. Now that the 23-year-old North Dakota native has led the Eagles to a 3 – 1 start, the QB has started to show a bit of swagger – at least by North Dakota standards.

Last weekend during the Eagles bye week, Wentz held a private party in the back room of Fargo’s Herd & Horns bar, reportedly dropping a grand “between games of darts and pool,” according to Philly.com, and then providing staff with a $500 tip. “He was very humble, especially as a guest,” one server, a current junior at NDSU, told CSN Philly. “He didn’t treat anyone like they were below him or anything.”

Related: HERE'S WHAT AN NFL LINEMAN EATS TO KEEP HIS WEIGHT UP

Speaking of humble, that’s certainly how Wentz left the party as well. CSN Philly also reported that after the event Wentz left in his cousin’s 1996 Chevy pickup truck.

“Hey, cuz, I know you want to show off to the staff at your college bar or whatever, but maybe show some love for the fam and get your boy a new truck? We all know how to Google ‘Carson Wentz contract,’ Mr. $17 Million Signing Bonus!” At least that’s what I imagine the conversation in the truck sounded like.

Regardless, it’s nice to see a wealthy football player taking care wait staff. We were starting to worry that poor treatment would become a trend.

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